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How young workers get their training: A survey of Germany versus the United States

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  • Rainer Winkelmann

    ()
    (University of Canterbury, Department of Economics, PB4800, Christchurch, New Zealand)

Abstract

The recent economic literature on the incidence of various forms of post-secondary on-the-job and off-the-job training in Germany and the United States, as well as on the effects of training on wages, inequality, and labor mobility is surveyed. Young workers in Germany receive substantially more company-based (apprenticeship) training than United States workers. In the United States, high turnover deters firms from investing in general skills while it results in improved job matches. The received literature consents that key institutional elements required to make the German apprenticeship system work are absent in the United States. JEL classification: I2, J3, J24

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 10 (1997)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 159-170

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:10:y:1997:i:2:p:159-170

Note: Received December 14, 1995 / Accepted February 19, 1996 received literature consents that key institutional elements required to make the German apprenticeship system work are absent in the United States. JEL classification: I2, J3, J24
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Related research

Keywords: Vocational training · apprenticeship · earnings;

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Cited by:
  1. Bornemann, Stefan, 2005. "Spillovers in Vocational Training," Discussion Papers in Economics 693, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  2. Wolfgang Franz & Joachim Inkmann & Winfried Pohlmeier & Volker Zimmermann, 1997. "Young and Out in Germany: On the Youths' Chances of Labor Market Entrance in Germany," NBER Working Papers 6212, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Cahuc, Pierre & Carcillo, Stéphane & Rinne, Ulf & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2013. "Youth Unemployment in Old Europe: The Polar Cases of France and Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 7490, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Steven McIntosh, 1999. "A cross-country comparison of the determinants of vocational training," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20213, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. Korpi, Tomas & Mertens, Antje, 2002. "Training systems and labor mobility: A comparison between Germany and Sweden," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 2002,19, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.
  6. Alda, Holger & Bellmann, Lutz & Gartner, Hermann, 2005. "Wage structure and labour mobility in the West German private sector 1993-2000," IAB Discussion Paper 200518, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  7. Schröder, Lena, 2004. "The role of youth programmes in the transition from school to work," Working Paper Series 2004:5, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  8. Lindner, Axel, 1998. "Modelling the German system of vocational education," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 411-423, December.
  9. Boom, A., 2001. "Firm's Investment in General Training and the Market for Skilled Labour," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 1101, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
  10. Euwals, R.W., 1997. "Empirical Studies on Individual Labour Market Behaviour," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-73881, Tilburg University.
  11. Andrew Sharpe & James Gibson, 2005. "The Apprenticeship System in Canada: Trends and Issues," CSLS Research Reports 2005-04, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
  12. Christian Dustmann & Uta Sch�nberg, 2012. "What Makes Firm-Based Vocational Training Schemes Successful? The Role of Commitment," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 36-61, April.

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