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The importance of education-occupation matching in migration decisions

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  • Michael Quinn

    ()

  • Stephen Rubb

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.2005.0008
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

Volume (Year): 42 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 153-167

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Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:42:y:2005:i:1:p:153-167

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Nachum Sicherman, 1987. "Over-Education in the Labor Market," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 48, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  2. Russell W. Rumberger, 1987. "The Impact of Surplus Schooling on Productivity and Earnings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 22(1), pages 24-50.
  3. Banerjee, Biswajit, 1991. "The determinants of migrating with a pre-arranged job and of the initial duration of urban unemployment : An analysis based on Indian data on rural-to-urban migrants," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 337-351, October.
  4. Allen, Jim & van der Velden, Rolf, 2001. "Educational Mismatches versus Skill Mismatches: Effects on Wages, Job Satisfaction, and On-the-Job Search," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 434-52, July.
  5. World Bank, 2002. "World Development Indicators 2002," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13921, January.
  6. Rubb, S., 2003. "Overeducation in the labor market: a comment and re-analysis of a meta-analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 621-629, December.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Paula Herrera & Enrique López-Bazo & Elisabet Motellón, 2013. "“Double Penalty in Returns to Education: Informality and Educational Mismatch in the Colombian Labour market”," AQR Working Papers 201304, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised May 2013.
  2. Michael Quinn & Stephen Rubb, 2011. "Spouse Overeducation and Family Migration: Evidence from the US," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 36-45, March.
  3. Beth Wilson & E. Helen Berry & Michael Toney & Young-Taek Kim & John Cromartie, 2009. "A Panel Based Analysis of the Effects of Race/Ethnicity and Other Individual Level Characteristics at Leaving on Returning," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 28(4), pages 405-428, August.
  4. Chantal Nielsen, 2011. "Immigrant over-education: evidence from Denmark," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 499-520, April.
  5. Stephen Rubb, 2006. "Educational Mismatches and Earnings: Extensions of Occupational Mobility Theory and Evidence of Human Capital Depreciation," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 135-154.
  6. Simona Iammarino & Elisabetta Marinelli, 2012. "Education-Job (Mis)Matching And Interregional Migration: Italian University Graduates’ Transition To Work," Management Working Papers 8, Birkbeck Department of Management, revised Sep 2012.
  7. Randall Kuhn & Bethany Everett & Rachel Silvey, 2011. "The Effects of Children’s Migration on Elderly Kin’s Health: A Counterfactual Approach," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(1), pages 183-209, February.
  8. Andrés Villarreal & Sarah Blanchard, 2013. "How Job Characteristics Affect International Migration: The Role of Informality in Mexico," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 751-775, April.
  9. Nina Neubecker, 2013. "Low Occupational Prestige and Internal Migration in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 562, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  10. Bilal Barakat & Rachel Durham, 2013. "Drop-out mayors and graduate farmers: Educational fertility differentials by occupational status and industry in six European countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(42), pages 1213-1262, June.

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