Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Discrimination sexuelle dans les dépenses des ménages : survol de la littérature et évidences empiriques pour le Canada

Contents:

Author Info

  • Lefebvre, Pierre

    (Département de sciences économiques)

Abstract

Recent research suggests that the sex of a child has a large and varied impact on parental behaviours and family outcomes. A general finding emerges from this literature: in terms of family choices (marriage, divorce, fertility) and individual behaviours (work, consumption, and non-market activities), there are noteworthy differences between men and women. The empirical findings are consistent with economic models that explain intra-family behaviours as the result of a process of complex negotiations over time allocation and family resources and the sharing of family “surplus” (gains from living with spouse compared to being single). This research approaches this question by analysing family expenditures for consumer goods and services for families that have one or two same-sex children. The empirical analysis tries to uncover gender effect for family expenditures by estimating the impact of children’s sex on a diversity of categorical expenses qualified as family products, such as housing and durable goods. Other types of products are also analyzed (food, medical services, recreation, food purchased from restaurant, personal services, health care services and products, gifts of money and contributions). The analysis uses the public micro-data of Statistics Canada’s Survey of Household Spending for years 1997 and 1998; the only two years where the sex of children aged 0 to 17 years are identified. The results suggest that gender effects are non-systemic and do not stand out. La recherche récente suggère que le sexe d’un enfant a des effets importants et étendus sur les comportements parentaux et les résultats familiaux. Un constat général émerge de cette littérature : en matière de choix de vie familiale (mariage, divorce, fécondité) et de comportements individuels (de travail, de consommation, d’activités non marchandes) il y a des différences notables entre les hommes et les femmes. Les constats empiriques sont cohérents avec les modèles économiques qui expliquent les comportements intrafamiliaux comme le résultat d’un processus complexe de négociations concernant l’allocation du temps et des ressources familiales, et le partage du « surplus » familial et conjugal (dégagé par rapport au fait de vivre seul). Cette recherche aborde la question en examinant le panier des dépenses de consommation des familles qui ont un ou deux enfants du même sexe. L’analyse empirique cherche à identifier s’il y a un effet de « genre » dans les dépenses familiales en estimant l’effet du sexe de l’enfant sur plusieurs catégories de dépenses dont des biens familiaux à caractère public tels que l’habitation et les biens durables. D’autres types de dépenses sont aussi analysés (alimentation, soins médicaux, loisir et divertissement, aliments achetés au restaurant, services personnels, soins de santé et médicaments, dons et contributions). L’analyse utilise les microdonnées des fichiers publics de l’Enquête sur les dépenses des ménages de 1997 et 1998, les deux seules années où Statistique Canada identifie le sexe des enfants de 0-17 ans. Les résultats empiriques suggèrent que les effets sont peu marqués et systémiques.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://id.erudit.org/iderudit/013467ar
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Société Canadienne de Science Economique in its journal L'Actualité économique.

Volume (Year): 82 (2006)
Issue (Month): 1 (mars-juin)
Pages: 119-153

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ris:actuec:v:82:y:2006:i:1:p:119-153

Contact details of provider:
Email:
Web page: http://www.scse.ca/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Rao, Vijayendra, 1993. "The Rising Price of Husbands: A Hedonic Analysis of Dowry Increases in Rural India," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(4), pages 666-77, August.
  2. Shelly Lundberg & Elaina Rose, 1999. "The Effect of Sons and Daughters on Men's Labor Supply and Wages," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 0033, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
  3. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2000. "Gender Differences in Pay," NBER Working Papers 7732, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Browning, Martin & Francois Bourguignon & Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Valerie Lechene, 1994. "Income and Outcomes: A Structural Model of Intrahousehold Allocation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1067-96, December.
  5. Shelly Lundberg & Robert A. Pollak, 1996. "Bargaining and Distribution in Marriage," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 139-158, Fall.
  6. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Maluccio, John A., 2000. "Intrahousehold allocation and gender relations," FCND briefs 84, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Thomas, Duncan & Strauss, John & Henriques, Maria-Helena, 1990. "Child survival, height for age and household characteristics in Brazil," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 197-234, October.
  8. Alain Marcoux, 2002. "Sex Differentials in Undernutrition: A Look at Survey Evidence," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(2), pages 275-284.
  9. Lundberg, Shelly & Rose, Elaina, 2000. "Parenthood and the earnings of married men and women," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(6), pages 689-710, November.
  10. Lundberg, S. & Pollak, R.A., 1991. "Separate Spheres Bargaining and the Marriage Market," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 91-08, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
  11. Ted Bergstrom, 1995. "A Survey of Theories of the Family," Papers _027, University of Michigan, Department of Economics.
  12. Schultz, T.P., 1990. "Testing The Neoclassical Model Of Family Labor Supply And Fertility," Papers 601, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  13. Schultz, T. Paul, 1993. "Demand for children in low income countries," Handbook of Population and Family Economics, in: M. R. Rosenzweig & Stark, O. (ed.), Handbook of Population and Family Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 349-430 Elsevier.
  14. Jonathan Haughton & Dominique Haughton, 1998. "Are simple tests of son preference useful? An evaluation using data from Vietnam," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 495-516.
  15. Anne Case & Christina Paxson, 2000. "Mothers and Others: Who Invests in Children’s Health?," Working Papers 277, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
  16. I-Fen Lin & Anne Case & Sara McLanahan, 1999. "Household Resource Allocation in Stepfamilies: Darwin Reflects on the Plight of Cinderella," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 234-238, May.
  17. Richard Blundell & Alan Duncan & Krishna Pendakur, 1998. "Semiparametric estimation and consumer demand," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(5), pages 435-461.
  18. Haddad, Lawrence & Hoddinott, John & Alderman, Harold & DEC, 1994. "Intrahousehold resource allocation : an overview," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1255, The World Bank.
  19. Subramanian, S. & Deaton, A., 1990. "Gender Effects In Indian Consumption Patterns," Papers 147, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Development Studies.
  20. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
  21. Stephan Klasen & Claudia Wink, 2002. "A Turning Point in Gender Bias in Mortality? An Update on the Number of Missing Women," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(2), pages 285-312.
  22. Fred Arnold & Sunita Kishor & T. K. Roy, 2002. "Sex-Selective Abortions in India," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 759-785.
  23. Thomas, D., 1989. "Intra-Household Resource Allocation: An Inferential Approach," Papers 586, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  24. Paul Schultz, T., 2001. "Women's roles in the agricultural household: Bargaining and human capital investments," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 383-456 Elsevier.
  25. Gordon B. Dahl & Enrico Moretti, 2008. "The Demand for Sons," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 1085-1120.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Lefebvre, Pierre, 2006. "Le gradient santé / revenu familial des nouveau-nés québécois de 1998 après quatre ans : faible ou inexistant?," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 82(4), pages 523-595, décembre.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ris:actuec:v:82:y:2006:i:1:p:119-153. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bruce Shearer).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.