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Liquidity and Market Crashes

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  • Jennifer Huang
  • Jiang Wang
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    Abstract

    In this paper, we develop an equilibrium model for stock market liquidity and its impact on asset prices when constant market presence is costly. We show that even when agents' trading needs are perfectly matched, costly market presence prevents them from synchronizing their trades and hence gives rise to endogenous order imbalances and the need for liquidity. Moreover, the endogenous liquidity need, when it occurs, is characterized by excessive selling of significant magnitudes. Such liquidity-driven selling leads to market crashes in the absence of any aggregate shocks. Finally, we show that illiquidity in the market leads to high expected returns, negative and asymmetric return serial correlation, and a positive relation between trading volume and future returns. We also propose new measures of liquidity based on its asymmetric impact on prices and demonstrate a negative relation between these measures and expected stock returns. The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Society for Financial Studies. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Society for Financial Studies in its journal The Review of Financial Studies.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 7 (July)
    Pages: 2407-2443

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:22:y:2009:i:7:p:2407-2443

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    Cited by:
    1. Jennifer Huang & Jiang Wang, 2008. "Market Liquidity, Asset Prices and Welfare," NBER Working Papers 14058, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Chung, Dennis Y. & Hrazdil, Karel, 2012. "Speed of convergence to market efficiency: The role of ECNs," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 702-720.
    3. Xiang, Ju & Zhu, Xiaoneng, 2014. "Intraday asymmetric liquidity and asymmetric volatility in FTSE-100 futures market," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 134-148.
    4. Dimitri Vayanos & Jiang Wang, 2012. "Market Liquidity - Theory and Empirical Evidence," FMG Discussion Papers dp709, Financial Markets Group.
    5. Anand, Amber & Irvine, Paul & Puckett, Andy & Venkataraman, Kumar, 2013. "Institutional trading and stock resiliency: Evidence from the 2007–2009 financial crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(3), pages 773-797.
    6. Poon, Ser-Huang & Rockinger, Michael & Stathopoulos, Konstantinos, 2013. "Market liquidity and institutional trading during the 2007–8 financial crisis," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 86-97.
    7. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Xinwei Zheng, 2012. "Asymmetric Information and Market Decline: Evidence from the Chinese Market," Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies (RPBFMP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 15(03), pages 1250019-1-1.
    8. Li, Wei & Wang, Steven Shuye, 2010. "Daily institutional trades and stock price volatility in a retail investor dominated emerging market," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 448-474, November.
    9. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Xinwei Zheng, 2011. "Asymmetric information and market collapse: Evidence from the Chinese Market," Financial Econometics Series 2011_09, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.

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