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Long-Term Effects of Class Size

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  • Peter Fredriksson
  • Björn Öckert
  • Hessel Oosterbeek

Abstract

This article evaluates the long-term effects of class size in primary school. We use rich data from Sweden and exploit variation in class size created by a maximum class size rule. Smaller classes in the last three years of primary school (age 10 to 13) are beneficial for cognitive and noncognitive ability at age 13, and improve achievement at age 16. Most important, we find that smaller classes have positive effects on completed education, wages, and earnings at age 27 to 42. The estimated wage effect is large enough to pass a cost-benefit test. JEL Codes: I21, I28, J24, C31. Copyright 2013, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal The Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 128 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 249-285

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Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:128:y:2013:i:1:p:249-285

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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Luck, & helpful illusions
    by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2012-07-19 13:38:56
  2. Childhood's legacy
    by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2012-11-06 14:01:55
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Cited by:
  1. Fredriksson, Peter & Öckert, Björn & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 2014. "Inside the Black Box of Class Size: Mechanisms, Behavioral Responses, and Social Background," IZA Discussion Papers 8019, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Cohen-Zada, Danny & Gradstein, Mark & Reuven, Ehud, 2013. "Allocation of students in public schools: Theory and new evidence," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 96-106.
  3. Pekkarinen, Tuomas, 2012. "Gender Differences in Education," IZA Discussion Papers 6390, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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