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A Quick Argument for Active Learning: The Effectiveness of One-Minute Papers

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  • Kristin Stowe
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    Abstract

    While lecture is the dominant means of delivering content in an economics class, the use of active learning techniques is slowly growing. This article focuses on the effectiveness of in-class writing. Consistent with prior research, this study finds that writing improves student performance on exams. Advances over prior research are offered in the particular usage of one- minute papers and in the availability of student data from the university’s Registrar. In particular, the use of one-minute papers is found to have a significant positive impact on student grades in a Principles of Macroeconomics course. Other key variables include a student’s attendance and prior academic record.

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    File URL: http://frank.mtsu.edu/~jee/2010/4pp33to39MS1209.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center in its journal Journal for Economic Educators.

    Volume (Year): 10 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (Summer)
    Pages: 33-39

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    Handle: RePEc:mts:jrnlee:v:10:y:2010:i:1:p:33-39

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    Web page: http://www.mtsu.edu/~jee
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    Related research

    Keywords: Active learning; Pedagogy; Student performance; Writing;

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    1. William E. Becker, 1997. "Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1347-1373, September.
    2. Michael Watts & William E. Becker, 2008. "A Little More than Chalk and Talk: Results from a Third National Survey of Teaching Methods in Undergraduate Economics Courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 273-286, July.
    3. Siegfried, John J & Strand, Stephen H, 1977. "Sex and the Economics Student," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(2), pages 247-49, May.
    4. Stephanie M. Brewer & James J. Jozefowicz, 2006. "Making Economic Principles Personal: Student Journals and Reflection Papers," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 202-216, April.
    5. Kenneth G. Elzinga & Daniel O. Melaugh, 2009. "35,000 Principles of Economics Students: Some Lessons Learned," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 76(1), pages 32-46, July.
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    Cited by:
    1. Lee E. Erickson & Patricia A. Erickson, 2013. "Predicting Student Performance Using Online One-Minute Papers," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 13(1), pages 6-13, Fall.

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