Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Keynes's animal spirits vindicated: an analysis of recent empirical and neural data on money illusion

Contents:

Author Info

  • Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde
  • Marianne Guille

Abstract

The tendency of people to think of money in nominal, rather than real, terms is now well documented by recent empirical data. In particular, experimental and neurobiological data provide new insights on the individual and subindividual (neurobiological processes) anchoring of money illusion. The sensitivity of the reward brain system to the nominal format of money may explain money illusion at a biological level and provide a sort of physical demonstration of Keynes animal spirits hypothesis. These findings make it more difficult to ignore the hedonic or emotional dimension of money, which lies outside the scope of homo economicus.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://mesharpe.metapress.com/link.asp?target=contribution&id=P13167365X3675W2
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by M.E. Sharpe, Inc. in its journal Journal of Post Keynesian Economics.

Volume (Year): 34 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (January)
Pages: 331-352

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:34:y:2011:i:2:p:331-352

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://mesharpe.metapress.com/link.asp?target=journal&id=109348

Related research

Keywords: animal spirits; experimental economics; money illusion; neuroeconomics;

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Paul Davidson, 2010. "Behavioral economists should make a turn and learn from Keynes and Post Keynesian economics," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 33(2), pages 251-254, January.
  2. Besancenot, Damien & Rocheteau, Guillaume & Vranceanu, Radu, 2000. "Search, Price Illusion and Welfare," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 109-124, January.
  3. Louis Christofides & Amy Chen Peng, 2003. "Contract Duration and Indexation in a Period of Real and Nominal Uncertainty," CESifo Working Paper Series 994, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Ernst Fehr & Jean-Robert Tyran, 2001. "Does Money Illusion Matter?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1239-1262, December.
  5. Edmund Cannon & Giam Pietro Cipriani, 2003. "Euro-illusion: a natural experiment," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 03/556, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  6. George A. Akerlof, 2009. "How Human Psychology Drives the Economy and Why It Matters," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1175-1175.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:34:y:2011:i:2:p:331-352. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Nguyen).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.