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State Support and Creativity in the Arts: Some New Considerations

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  • Bruno Frey

Abstract

Neglected aspects of state support for the arts are discussed through posing two questions. First, “What kind of state is providing that support?” The extent and type of public support and its effects on the arts crucially depends on whether the state is centralised or decentralised, and on whether it is authoritarian or democratic. Second, “How is artistic creativity fostered?” ”Institutional creativity” is best supported by attributing a large role to the market and market-like institutions. “Personal creativity” hinges on intrinsic motivation, which may be crowded out by different types of public support. Important consequences for the public support of the arts follow. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1007518203490
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Cultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 23 (1999)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 71-85

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:23:y:1999:i:1:p:71-85

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100284

Related research

Keywords: art subsidies; state support; creativity; crowding-out; institutions;

References

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  1. Austen-Smith, M David & Jenkins, Stephen P, 1985. "A Multiperiod Model of Nonprofit Enterprises," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 32(2), pages 119-34, June.
  2. Victor Ginsburgh & Pierre-Michel Menger, 1996. "Economics of the arts: selected essays," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/1655, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. Stigler, George J & Becker, Gary S, 1977. "De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 76-90, March.
  4. Frey, Bruno S., 1996. "Has Baumol's Cost Disease disappeared in the performing arts?," Ricerche Economiche, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 173-182, June.
  5. Henry Hansmann, 1981. "Nonprofit Enterprise in the Performing Arts," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 12(2), pages 341-361, Autumn.
  6. Frey, Bruno S & Oberholzer-Gee, Felix & Eichenberger, Reiner, 1996. "The Old Lady Visits Your Backyard: A Tale of Morals and Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(6), pages 1297-1313, December.
  7. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1985. "The Expanding Domain of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(6), pages 53-68, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Gaudeul, Alexia, 2008. "Consumer welfare and market structure in a model of competition between open source and proprietary software," MPRA Paper 19555, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Bruno S. Frey, . "The Rise and Fall of Festivals: Reflections on the Salzburg Festival," IEW - Working Papers 048, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  3. Michael Getzner, 2002. "Determinants of Public Cultural Expenditures: An Exploratory Time Series Analysis for Austria," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 287-306, November.
  4. Bruce Seaman, 2004. "Competition and the Non-Profit Arts: The Lost Industrial Organization Agenda," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 167-193, August.
  5. Michael Rushton, 2000. "Public Funding of Controversial Art," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 267-282, November.
  6. Xavier Castañer & Lorenzo Campos, 2002. "The Determinants of Artistic Innovation: Bringing in the Role of Organizations," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 29-52, February.
  7. Bruno S. Frey, . "Art Fakes - What Fakes? An Economic View," IEW - Working Papers 014, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  8. Jason Potts, 2009. "Why creative industries matter to economic evolution," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(7), pages 663-673.

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