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The quality of medical care, behavioral risk factors, and longevity growth

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  • Frank Lichtenberg

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Abstract

The rate of increase of longevity has varied considerably across U.S. states since 1991. This paper examines the effect of the quality of medical care, behavioral risk factors (obesity, smoking, and AIDS incidence), and other variables (education, income, and health insurance coverage) on life expectancy and medical expenditure using longitudinal state-level data. We examine the effects of three different measures of the quality of medical care. The first is the average quality of diagnostic imaging procedures, defined as the fraction of procedures that are advanced procedures. The second is the average quality of practicing physicians, defined as the fraction of physicians that were trained at top-ranked medical schools. The third is the mean vintage (FDA approval year) of outpatient and inpatient prescription drugs. Life expectancy increased more rapidly in states where (1) the fraction of Medicare diagnostic imaging procedures that were advanced procedures increased more rapidly; (2) the vintage of self- and provider-administered drugs increased more rapidly; and (3) the quality of medical schools previously attended by physicians increased more rapidly. States with larger increases in the quality of diagnostic procedures, drugs, and physicians did not have larger increases in per capita medical expenditure.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10754-010-9086-y
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics.

Volume (Year): 11 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 1-34

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Handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:11:y:2011:i:1:p:1-34

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=106603

Related research

Keywords: Longevity; Mortality; Innovation; Health expenditure; I12; J11; H51; H75; O33; O51; P46;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Frank R. Lichtenberg, 2012. "Pharmaceutical Innovation and Longevity Growth in 30 Developing and High-income Countries, 2000-2009," NBER Working Papers 18235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Hsieh, Chee-Ruey & Liu, Ya-Ming & Chang, Chia-Lin, 2011. "Endogenous technological change in medicine and its impact on healthcare costs: evidence from the pharmaceutical market in Taiwan," MPRA Paper 35147, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Lichtenberg Frank R., 2013. "The Effect of Pharmaceutical Innovation on Longevity: Patient Level Evidence from the 1996–2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and Linked Mortality Public-use Files," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-33, January.
  4. Frank R. Lichtenberg, 2013. "The Impact of Biomedical Knowledge Accumulation on Mortality: A Bibliometric Analysis of Cancer Data," NBER Chapters, in: Measuring and Modeling Health Care Costs National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Lichtenberg, Frank R., 2014. "The impact of pharmaceutical innovation on longevity and medical expenditure in France, 2000–2009," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 107-127.
  6. Frank R. Lichtenberg, 2012. "Contribution of Pharmaceutical Innovation to Longevity Growth in Germany and France, 2001-7," PharmacoEconomics, Springer Healthcare | Adis, vol. 30(3), pages 197-211.

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