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Estimating the Impact of Medical Innovation: A Case Study of HIV Antiretroviral Treatments

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  • Duggan Mark G

    ()
    (University of Maryland, College Park)

  • Evans William N

    ()
    (University of Notre Dame)

Abstract

As health care consumes a growing share of GDP, the demand for better evidence regarding the effects of health care treatments and how these vary across individuals is increasing. Estimating this with observational data is difficult given the endogeneity of treatment decisions. But because the random assignment clinical trials (RACTs) used in the FDA approval process only estimate average health effects and do not consider spending, there is no good alternative. In this study we use administrative data from California's Medicaid program to estimate the impact of HIV antiretroviral treatments (ARVs). We use data on health care utilization to proxy for health status and exploit the rapid takeup of ARVs following their FDA approval. Our estimate of a 68 percent average mortality rate reduction is in line with the results from RACTs. We also find that the ARVs lowered short-term health care spending by reducing expenditures on other categories of medical care. Combining these two effects we estimate the cost per life year saved at $19,000. Our results suggest an alternative method for estimating the real-world effects of new treatments that is especially well-suited to those treatments that diffuse rapidly following their approval.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Forum for Health Economics & Policy.

Volume (Year): 11 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (January)
Pages: 1-39

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Handle: RePEc:bpj:fhecpo:v:11:y:2008:i:2:n:1

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  1. Alberto Abadie & Joshua Angrist & Guido Imbens, 2002. "Instrumental Variables Estimates of the Effect of Subsidized Training on the Quantiles of Trainee Earnings," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(1), pages 91-117, January.
  2. Jay Bhattacharya & Dana Goldman & Neeraj Sood, 2002. "The Link Between Public and Private Insurance and HIV-Related Mortality," NBER Working Papers 9346, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Mark Duggan, 2002. "Does Contracting Out Increase the Efficiency of Government Programs? Evidence from Medicaid HMOs," NBER Working Papers 9091, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Heckman, James J & Smith, Jeffrey, 1997. "Making the Most Out of Programme Evaluations and Social Experiments: Accounting for Heterogeneity in Programme Impacts," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 487-535, October.
  5. David Meltzer, 1997. "Accounting for Future Costs in Medical Cost-Effectiveness Analysis," NBER Working Papers 5946, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Duggan, Mark, 2005. "Do new prescription drugs pay for themselves?: The case of second-generation antipsychotics," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 1-31, January.
  7. Meltzer, David, 1997. "Accounting for future costs in medical cost-effectiveness analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 33-64, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Abdülkad&idot;r C&idot;van & Bülent Köksal, 2010. "The effect of newer drugs on health spending: do they really increase the costs?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 581-595.
  2. Barros, Pedro Luis Pita & Martinez-Giralt, Xavier, 2009. "Technological adoption in health care," CEPR Discussion Papers 7558, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Amitabh Chandra & Jonathan Skinner, 2012. "Technology Growth and Expenditure Growth in Health Care," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 645-80, September.
  4. Rebecca M. Henderson & Richard G. Newell, 2011. "Introduction and Summary to "Accelerating Energy Innovation: Insights from Multiple Sectors"," NBER Chapters, in: Accelerating Energy Innovation: Insights from Multiple Sectors, pages 1-23 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Rebecca M. Henderson & Richard G. Newell, 2011. "Accelerating Energy Innovation: Insights from Multiple Sectors," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number hend09-1, July.
  6. Frank R. Lichtenberg, 2006. "The Impact of Increased Utilization of HIV Drugs on Longevity and Medical Expenditures: An Assessment Based on Aggregate U.S. Time-Series Data," NBER Working Papers 12406, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Frank R. Lichtenberg, 2009. "The Quality of Medical Care, Behavioral Risk Factors, and Longevity Growth," NBER Working Papers 15068, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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