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Balancing nutrition, luxury, and time constraints in food preparation choices

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  • Sanae Tashiro
  • Chu-Ping Lo
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    Abstract

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine how nutritional concerns, luxurious tastes, and the value of time affect time allocation decisions for food preparation. Design/methodology/approach – A time allocation model is developed and tested with Tobit and Heckman's sample selection models using the 2003-2007 American Time Use Survey data. Findings – Individuals concerned more with nutrition or price than luxury devote more time to preparing food-cooked-at-home. High family income and long hours worked increase time allocated to food-away-from-home, indicating that a preference for luxury and the opportunity cost of time outweigh nutritional concerns. High education reduces time spent preparing food-cooked-at-home, yet increases both participation in this activity and time spent obtaining food-away-from-home, suggesting that a preference for luxury and the opportunity cost of time dominate nutritional preference. Time allocation decisions on food preparation vary greatly by race and ethnicity. Originality/value – The results of this study confirm that the time allocation decisions regarding food preparation are largely affected by an individual's luxury preference, nutritional consciousness, and the value of time, all of which are influenced by education. The findings from this study indicate factors that influence consumers' time allocation decisions regarding food choice and their current food preparation behavior, and thus provide useful insights to nutritionists, dietitians, health practitioners, and policy makers for finding better ways to improve nutritional education, food choices and dietary habits that promote healthier diets and eating habits. JEL classification: J01, J16, J22

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Emerald Group Publishing in its journal China Agricultural Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 3 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 245-265

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    Handle: RePEc:eme:caerpp:v:3:y:2011:i:2:p:245-265

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    Related research

    Keywords: Cooking; Diet; Food products; Individual behaviour;

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    References

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    1. Ana M. Angulo & José M. Gil & Jes�s Mur, 2007. "Spanish Demand for Food Away from Home: Analysis of Panel Data," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 289-307, 06.
    2. Maria Sagrario Floro & Marjorie Miles, 2003. "Time use, work and overlapping activities: evidence from Australia," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(6), pages 881-904, November.
    3. Veeck, Ann & Veeck, Gregory, 2000. "Consumer Segmentation and Changing Food Purchase Patterns in Nanjing, PRC," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 457-471, March.
    4. Angulo, Ana Maria & Gil, Jose Maria & Mur, Jesus, 2002. "Spanish Demand for Food Away From Home: A Panel Data Approach," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24977, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
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    7. Hengyun Ma & Jikun Huang & Frank Fuller & Scott Rozelle, 2006. "Getting Rich and Eating Out: Consumption of Food Away from Home in Urban China," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 54(1), pages 101-119, 03.
    8. Martinez, Stephen W. & Stewart, Hayden, 2003. "From Supply Push to Demand Pull: Agribusiness Strategies for Today's Consumers," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, November.
    9. Bruce Pietrykowski, 2004. "You Are What You Eat: The Social Economy of the Slow Food Movement," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 62(3), pages 307-321.
    10. Mancino, Lisa & Newman, Constance, 2007. "Who Has Time To Cook? How Family Resources Influence Food Preparation," Economic Research Report 55961, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    11. Stewart, Hayden & Blisard, Noel & Jolliffe, Dean & Bhuyan, Sanjib, 2005. "The Demand for Food Away from Home: Do Other Preferences Compete with Our Desire to Eat Healthfully?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 30(03), December.
    12. Stewart, Hayden & Yen, Steven T., 2004. "Changing household characteristics and the away-from-home food market: a censored equation system approach," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 643-658, December.
    13. Schluep Campo, Isabelle & Beghin, John C., 2006. "Dairy food consumption, supply, and policy in Japan," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 228-237, June.
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    Cited by:
    1. Joan del Castillo & Juan-Pablo Ortega, 2011. "Hedging of time discrete auto-regressive stochastic volatility options," Papers 1110.6322, arXiv.org.

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