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Did the World Bank Drive Tariff Reforms in Eastern Africa?

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  • Jones, Chris
  • Morrissey, Oliver
  • Nelson, Doug

Abstract

Summary This paper explores tariff reform in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda between the early 1990s and early 2000s. Tariffs were reformed in an across the board manner consistent with implementing World Bank programs: the average tariff was reduced and the dispersion of tariffs was compressed, with the highest tariffs being eliminated. There is limited evidence of political economy influences on the cross sector pattern of tariffs and reforms, except for a tendency to offer greater protection to larger manufacturing sectors in all countries except Uganda. The technocratic reforms have diluted relative protection and political economy influences in all the four countries.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 39 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 (March)
Pages: 324-335

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:3:p:324-335

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

Related research

Keywords: pattern of protection tariff reform political economy Eastern Africa;

References

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  1. Hiau Looi Kee & Nicita, Alessandro & Olarreaga, Marcelo, 2004. "Import demand elasticities and trade distortions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3452, The World Bank.
  2. Nash, John & DEC, 1993. "Implementation of trade reform in sub-Saharan Africa : how much heat and how much light?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1218, The World Bank.
  3. Richard M. Auty & Oliver Morrissey, 1995. "Politics and economic policy reform: Trade liberalization in subā€Saharan Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(4), pages 599-618, 07.
  4. Oliver Morrissey, 2004. "Conditionality and Aid Effectiveness Re-evaluated," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(2), pages 153-171, 02.
  5. Olivier Cadot & Jaime de Melo & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2004. "Lobbying, Counterlobbying, and the Structure of Tariff Protection in Poor and Rich Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 18(3), pages 345-366.
  6. Oliver Morrissey & Chris Jones, 2008. "Missed Opportunities: The WTO Trade Policy Review for the East African Community," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(11), pages 1409-1432, November.
  7. Grossman, G.M. & Helpman, E., 1992. "Protection for Sale," Papers 21-92, Tel Aviv.
  8. Arne Bigsten & Mulu Gebreeyesus, 2009. "Firm Productivity and Exports: Evidence from Ethiopian Manufacturing," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(10), pages 1594-1614.
  9. Jiandong Ju & Yi Wu & Li Zeng, 2010. "The Impact of Trade Liberalization on the Trade Balance in Developing Countries," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 57(2), pages 427-449, June.
  10. Oliver Morrissey, 2005. "Imports and Implementation: Neglected Aspects of Trade in the Report of the Commission for Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(6), pages 1133-1153.
  11. Greenaway, David & Morrissey, Oliver, 1993. "Structural Adjustment and Liberalisation in Developing Countries: What Lessons Have We Learned?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 241-61.
  12. C. Milner & O. Morrissey & N. Rudaheranwa, 2000. "Policy and Non-Policy Barriers to Trade and Implicit Taxation of Exports in Uganda," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 67-90.
  13. Foroutan, Faezeh, 1993. "Trade reform in ten sub-Saharan African countries : achievements and failures," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1222, The World Bank.
  14. Santos-Paulino, Amelia U., 2002. "The Effects of Trade Liberalization on Imports in Selected Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 959-974, June.
  15. Amelia Santos-Paulino & A. P. Thirlwall, 2004. "The impact of trade liberalisation on exports, imports and the balance of payments of developing countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages F50-F72, 02.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Paul Clist & Alessia Isopi & Oliver Morrissey, 2012. "Selectivity on aid modality: Determinants of budget support from multilateral donors," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 267-284, September.
  2. Mathilde Douillet, 2012. "Trade policies and agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa: Comparative analysis in a Computable General Equilibrium framework," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/45eb019724s, Sciences Po.
  3. Szirmai, Adam & Gebreeyesus, Mulu & Guadagno, Francesca & Verspagen, Bart, 2013. "Promoting productive employment in Sub-Saharan Africa: A review of the literature," MERIT Working Papers 062, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  4. Douillet, Mathilde, 2012. "Trade and agricultural policies in Malawi: Not all policy reform is equally good for the poor," MPRA Paper 40948, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Smets, Lodewijk & Knack, Stephen, 2014. "World Bank lending and the quality of economic policy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6924, The World Bank.
  6. Douillet, Mathilde, 2012. "Trade policy reforms in the new agricultural context: Is regional integration a priority for Sub-Saharan African countries agricultural-led industrialization? Insights from a global computable general," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126546, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  7. Hisali, Eria, 2012. "Trade policy reform and international trade tax revenue in Uganda," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2144-2154.
  8. Douillet, Mathilde, 2011. "Which trade integration scheme can best help Sub-Saharan Africa develop and export more processed agricultural goods?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1119, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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