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Consumer preferences for household water treatment products in Andhra Pradesh, India

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Author Info

  • Poulos, Christine
  • Yang, Jui-Chen
  • Patil, Sumeet R.
  • Pattanayak, Subhrendu
  • Wood, Siri
  • Goodyear, Lorelei
  • Gonzalez, Juan Marcos

Abstract

Over 5 billion people worldwide are exposed to unsafe water. Given the obstacles to ensuring sustainable improvements in water supply infrastructure and the unhygienic handling of water after collection, household water treatment and storage (HWTS) products have been viewed as important mechanisms for increasing access to safe water. Although studies have shown that HWTS technologies can reduce the likelihood of diarrheal illness by about 30%, levels of adoption and continued use remain low. An understanding of household preferences for HWTS products can be used to create demand through effective product positioning and social marketing, and ultimately improve and ensure commercial sustainability and scalability of these products. However, there has been little systematic research on consumer preferences for HWTS products.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

Volume (Year): 75 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 738-746

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Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:75:y:2012:i:4:p:738-746

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Related research

Keywords: Conjoint analysis; Discrete choice experiment; In-home water treatment; Safe drinking water; Willingness to pay; Formative research; India;

References

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