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Attribute processing in environmental choice analysis: implications for willingness to pay

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  • Campbell, Danny
  • Lorimer, Victoria
  • Aravena, Claudia
  • Hutchinson, W. George

Abstract

Data from a discrete choice experiment is used to investigate the implications of failing to account for attribute processing strategies (APSs). The research was designed to elicit the economic benefits associated with landscape restoration activities that were intended to remediate environmental damage caused by illegal dumping activities. In this paper we accommodate APSs using an equality constrained latent class model. By retrieving the conditional class membership probabilities we recover estimates of the weights that each respondent assigned to each attribute, which we subsequently use ensure unnecessary weight is not allocated to attributes not attended to by respondents. Results from the analysis provide strong evidence that significant gains in models fit as well as more defensible and reliable willingness to pay estimates can be achieved using when the APSs are accounted for.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/91718
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Agricultural Economics Society in its series 84th Annual Conference, March 29-31, 2010, Edinburgh, Scotland with number 91718.

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Date of creation: 29 Mar 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aesc10:91718

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Keywords: Attribute processing strategies; environmental restoration; equality constrained latent class model; multinomial logit model; willingness to pay; Environmental Economics and Policy;

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  1. Kjartan Sælensminde, 2002. "The Impact of Choice Inconsistencies in Stated Choice Studies," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 23(4), pages 403-420, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Mohammed Hussen Alemu & Morten Raun Mørkbak & Søren Bøye Olsen & Carsten Lynge Jensen, 2011. "Attending to the reasons for attribute non-attendance in Choice Experiments," IFRO Working Paper 2011/8, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
  2. Poulos, Christine & Yang, Jui-Chen & Patil, Sumeet R. & Pattanayak, Subhrendu & Wood, Siri & Goodyear, Lorelei & Gonzalez, Juan Marcos, 2012. "Consumer preferences for household water treatment products in Andhra Pradesh, India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(4), pages 738-746.
  3. Collins, Andrew T. & Rose, John M. & Hensher, David A., 2013. "Specification issues in a generalised random parameters attribute nonattendance model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 234-253.
  4. Marsh, Dan & Mkwara, Lena Asimenye & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2010. "Does respondent’s perceived knowledge of the status quo affect attribute attendance and WTP in choice experiments? Evidence from the Karapiro Catchment Freshwater streams," 2010 Conference, August 26-27, 2010, Nelson, New Zealand 96809, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

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