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Housing instability and health: Findings from the Michigan recession and recovery study

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  • Burgard, Sarah A.
  • Seefeldt, Kristin S.
  • Zelner, Sarah
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    Abstract

    The recession of the late 2000s has increased interest in the consequences of housing instability. Previous research has shown poorer health among those experiencing housing instability, but extant studies generally have focused on selected populations (e.g., homeowners or renters) or studied only one type of housing instability (e.g. homelessness). Using new data from the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study, a population-based sample of working-aged adults from Southeastern Michigan, U.S.A., in late 2009–early 2010, we found that about one-third of respondents recently experienced some type of housing instability. Many, but not all, types of instability were associated with health. Even after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and earlier health, individuals who had moved for cost reasons in the past three years were more likely than those with no housing instability to report a recent anxiety attack, while those who experienced homelessness in the past year had a higher likelihood of reporting fair/poor self-rated health and of meeting criteria for major or minor depression. Renters behind on rental payments were more likely to meet criteria for depression, while mortgage-holders behind on their mortgage or in foreclosure had a higher likelihood of reporting fair/poor self-rated health or a recent anxiety attack. Among respondents who had ever owned a home, those who completed a foreclosure recently were more likely to report major or minor depression or an anxiety attack. However, frequent moves were not associated with poorer health, and doubling up and eviction were not associated with poorer health after adjustment for characteristics that sort people into different housing instability experiences. Our findings suggest the importance of considering multiple types of housing instability and using appropriate risk groups and comparison categories.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 75 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 12 ()
    Pages: 2215-2224

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:75:y:2012:i:12:p:2215-2224

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description

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    Related research

    Keywords: U.S.; Housing instability; Recession; Foreclosure; Homelessness;

    References

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    1. Fuller, Theodore D. & Edwards, John N. & Vorakitphokatorn, Sairudee & Sermsri, Santhat, 1996. "Chronic stress and psychological well-being: Evidence from Thailand on household crowding," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 265-280, January.
    2. Kelly D. Edmiston & Roger Zalneraitis, 2007. "Rising foreclosures in the United States: a perfect storm," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q IV, pages 115-145.
    3. He, Yinghua & O'Flaherty, Brendan & Rosenheck, Robert A., 2010. "Is shared housing a way to reduce homelessness? The effect of household arrangements on formerly homeless people," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 1-12, March.
    4. Brian K. Bucks & Arthur B. Kennickell & Kevin B. Moore, 2006. "Recent changes in U.S. family finances: evidence from the 2001 and 2004 Survey of Consumer Finances," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Mar, pages A1-A38.
    5. Lauren M. Ross & Gregory D. Squires, 2011. "The Personal Costs of Subprime Lending and the Foreclosure Crisis: A Matter of Trust, Insecurity, and Institutional Deception," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 92(1), pages 140-163, 03.
    6. Robert G. Wood & Anu Rangarajan, 2004. "The Benefits of Housing Subsidies for TANF Recipients: Evidence from New Jersey," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 4264, Mathematica Policy Research.
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    Cited by:
    1. Kemp-Benedict, Eric, 2013. "Material needs and aggregate demand," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 16-26.
    2. Melissa McInerney & Jennifer M. Mellor & Lauren Hersch Nicholas, 2013. "Recession Depression: Mental Health Effects of the 2008 Stock Market Crash," CESifo Working Paper Series 4263, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Robin Dion & Amy Dworsky & Jackie Kauff & Rebecca Kleinman, 2014. "Housing for Youth Aging Out of Foster Care," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 8139, Mathematica Policy Research.
    4. Kalousova, Lucie & Burgard, Sarah A., 2014. "Unemployment, measured and perceived decline of economic resources: Contrasting three measures of recessionary hardships and their implications for adopting negative health behaviors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 28-34.

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