Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Rising foreclosures in the United States: a perfect storm

Contents:

Author Info

  • Kelly D. Edmiston
  • Roger Zalneraitis

Abstract

Residential foreclosures in the United States have been rising very rapidly since 2006. In the second quarter of 2007, the share of outstanding mortgages in some stage of foreclosure stood at 1.4 percent, near historic highs and up from less than 1 percent a year earlier. The number of mortgages entering the foreclosure process reached an all-time high in mid-2007, suggesting that the foreclosure surge is likely to get worse before it gets better. ; The foreclosure surge was created by a perfect storm of events. First, in recent years the share of subprime mortgage originations increased substantially. Second, foreclosure rates for adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) have increased considerably, especially for subprime ARMs. This increase is largely due to rising short-term interest rates and to payment resets for many nontraditional mortgages. Finally, high loan-to-value originations in recent years, coupled with stagnant or falling home prices, have left many people with insufficient equity to sell or refinance their homes. ; Edmiston and Zalneraitis provide a detailed dissection of the current foreclosure surge. They conclude with a discussion of why the foreclosure situation is likely to get worse over the next one to two years and why it is likely to improve afterward.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.kansascityfed.org/Publicat/ECONREV/PDF/4q07Edmiston.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City in its journal Economic Review.

Volume (Year): (2007)
Issue (Month): Q IV ()
Pages: 115-145

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2007:i:qiv:p:115-145:n:v.92no.4

Contact details of provider:
Postal: One Memorial Drive, Kansas City, MO 64198
Phone: (816) 881-2254
Web page: http://www.kansascityfed.org
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: Mortgage loans;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Kahn, Charles M & Yavas, Abdullah, 1994. "The Economic Role of Foreclosures," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 35-51, January.
  2. Brent W. Ambrose & Charles A. Capone, 1998. "Modeling the Conditional Probability of Foreclosure in the Context of Single-Family Mortgage Default Resolutions," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 26(3), pages 391-429.
  3. Paul S. Calem & Kevin Gillen & Susan Wachter, . "The Neighborhood Distribution of Subprime Mortgage Lending," Zell/Lurie Center Working Papers 404, Wharton School Samuel Zell and Robert Lurie Real Estate Center, University of Pennsylvania.
  4. John M. Quigley., 1993. "Explicit Tests of Contingent Claims Models of Mortgage Defaults," Economics Working Papers 93-221, University of California at Berkeley.
  5. Clauretie, Terrence M & Herzog, Thomas N, 1990. "The Effect of State Foreclosure Laws on Loan Losses: Evidence from the Mortgage Insurance Industry," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 22(2), pages 221-33, May.
  6. Jordan Rappaport, 2007. "A guide to aggregate house price measures," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 41-71.
  7. Meador, Mark, 1982. "The effects of mortgage laws on home mortgage rates," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-148.
  8. Terrence M. Clauretie, 1987. "The Impact of Interstate Foreclosure Cost Differences and the Value of Mortgages on Default Rates," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 15(3), pages 152-167.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. William H. Rogers & William Winter, 2009. "The Impact of Foreclosures on Neighboring Housing Sales," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 31(4), pages 455-480.
  2. Allen C. Goodman & Brent C. Smith, 2010. "Housing default: theory works and so does policy," Working Paper 10-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  3. Burgard, Sarah A. & Seefeldt, Kristin S. & Zelner, Sarah, 2012. "Housing instability and health: Findings from the Michigan recession and recovery study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(12), pages 2215-2224.
  4. Luci Ellis, 2008. "How many in negative equity? The role of mortgage contract characteristics," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
  5. Goodman, Allen C. & Smith, Brent C., 2010. "Residential mortgage default: Theory works and so does policy," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 280-294, December.
  6. Rickman, Dan S. & Guettabi, Mouhcine, 2013. "The Great Recession and Nonmetropolitan America," MPRA Paper 44829, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2007:i:qiv:p:115-145:n:v.92no.4. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (LDayrit).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.