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Trust and institutions: A multilevel analysis

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  • Wang, Lanlan
  • Gordon, Peter
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    Abstract

    In this study, we argue that levels of trust are shaped by formal and informal institutions. We discuss statistical test results that support this view. These utilize World Value Survey results and related data sources to examine the ways that institutions and contextual factors affect individuals’ self-reported trust levels. This investigation is the first, to our knowledge, to take into account micro-unit along with macro-unit characteristics to analyze the nature of contextual effects and does so by applying a multilevel regression approach.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053535711000461
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

    Volume (Year): 40 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 583-593

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:40:y:2011:i:5:p:583-593

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

    Related research

    Keywords: Trust; Institutions; Multilevel analysis;

    References

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    1. Guiso, Luigi & Sapienza, Paola & Zingales, Luigi, 2002. "People's Opium? Religion and Economic Attitudes," CEPR Discussion Papers 3588, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Delhey, Jan & Newton, Kenneth, 2004. "Social trust: global pattern or nordic exceptionalism?," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Inequality and Social Integration SP I 2004-202, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    3. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silane & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1996. "Trust in Large Organizations," NBER Working Papers 5864, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Guido Tabellini, 2005. "Culture and Institutions: economic development in the regions of Europe," Working Papers 292, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    5. Williamson, Oliver E, 1993. "Calculativeness, Trust, and Economic Organization," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(1), pages 453-86, April.
    6. Scheinkman, Jose A. & Soutter, Christine L. & Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Laibson, David I., 2000. "Measuring Trust," Scholarly Articles 4481497, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    7. John W. Dawson, 2001. "Causality in the Freedom-Growth Relationship," Working Papers 01-04, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    8. Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales & Luigi Guiso, 2006. "Does Culture Affect Economic Outcomes?," NBER Working Papers 11999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Berggren, Niclas & Jordahl, Henrik, 2005. "Free to Trust? Economic Freedom and Social Capital," Ratio Working Papers 64, The Ratio Institute.
    10. Sjoerd Beugelsdijk, 2006. "A note on the theory and measurement of trust in explaining differences in economic growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(3), pages 371-387, May.
    11. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    12. Zak, Paul J & Knack, Stephen, 2001. "Trust and Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(470), pages 295-321, April.
    13. Geertz, Clifford, 1978. "The Bazaar Economy: Information and Search in Peasant Marketing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 28-32, May.
    14. Beugelsdijk, S. & Schaik, A.B.T.M. van, 2001. "Social Capital and Regional Economic Growth," Discussion Paper 2001-102, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. Gaël Plumecocq, 2013. "The Institutionalisation of Multi-level Changes: Sustainable Development, Values and Territory," Post-Print hal-00994871, HAL.
    2. Hassani Mahmooei, Behrooz & Parris, Brett, 2012. "Dynamics of effort allocation and evolution of trust: an agent-based model," MPRA Paper 44919, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Butzbach, Olivier, 2014. "Trust in banks: a tentative conceptual framework," MPRA Paper 53587, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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