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Sources of energy productivity growth and its distribution dynamics in China

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  • Wang, Chunhua

Abstract

The purposes of this paper are to determine the sources of energy productivity growth at the provincial level in China and to examine the relative contributions of the sources and their impacts on regional inequality. Energy productivity change is first decomposed into five components attributable to changes in capital-energy ratio, labor-energy ratio, output structure, and technical efficiency change and technological change. Then a nonparametric analysis is implemented to statistically test the relative contributions of the components and their roles in the distribution dynamics of energy productivity. It is found that (1) changes in capital-energy ratio, output structure, and technological change contribute to energy productivity growth in China, (2) increase in capital-energy ratio caused by capital accumulation is the primary driving force for energy productivity growth, and (3) capital accumulation contributes to energy productivity convergence between Chinese provinces over the time period of 1990-2005.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Resource and Energy Economics.

Volume (Year): 33 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 279-292

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Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:33:y:2011:i:1:p:279-292

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505569

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Keywords: Energy productivity Data envelopment analysis Growth Convergence Nonparametric;

References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Christian Gross, 2011. "Explaining the (non-) causality between energy and economic growth in the U.S. - A multivariate sectoral analysis," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2011-04, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  2. Wang, Chunhua, 2013. "Changing energy intensity of economies in the world and its decomposition," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 637-644.
  3. Ma, Chunbo, 2014. "A multi-fuel, multi-sector and multi-region approach to index decomposition: An application to China's energy consumption 1995–2010," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 9-16.
  4. Stern, David I., 2012. "Modeling international trends in energy efficiency," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 2200-2208.

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