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Should I stay or should I go? The effect of gender, education and unemployment on labour market transitions

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  • Theodossiou, I.
  • Zangelidis, A.

Abstract

This paper re-examines the turnover behaviour of men and women using panel data from six European countries. It makes a distinction between job-to-job (JJ) and job-to-non-employment (JNE) transitions, and explores the role that education and unemployment play in gender differences regarding these mobility patterns. Low educated women have lower JJ transition probabilities but are more likely to exit to non-employment compared to the other groups, high-educated women and men of all educational levels. Furthermore, unemployment reduces the JJ turnover of male and female workers of all educational levels. There is a pro-cyclical response in the JNE transitions of the less-educated males and a counter-cyclical response in the JNE transitions of the less-educated females. Finally, there are remarkable similarities in labour market mobility across countries, although there are various institutional and other labour market differences.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

Volume (Year): 16 (2009)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 566-577

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Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:16:y:2009:i:5:p:566-577

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

Related research

Keywords: Labour mobility Gender Education Unemployment;

References

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Cited by:
  1. Eryar, Değer & Tekgüç, Hasan, 2013. "Gender effect in explaining the mobility patterns in the labor market: a Case study from Turkey," MPRA Paper 46006, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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