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Are experimental economists prone to framing effects? A natural field experiment

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  • Gächter, Simon
  • Orzen, Henrik
  • Renner, Elke
  • Starmer, Chris

Abstract

An extensive literature demonstrates the existence of framing effects in the laboratory and in questionnaire studies. This paper reports new evidence from a natural field experiment using a subject pool one might expect to be particularly resistant to such effects: experimental economists. We find that while the behaviour of junior experimental economists is affected by the description of the decision task they face, this is not the case for the more senior members of our subject pool.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 70 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 443-446

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:70:y:2009:i:3:p:443-446

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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Keywords: Framing Field experiments;

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References

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  1. John A. List, 2003. "Does Market Experience Eliminate Market Anomalies?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(1), pages 41-71, February.
  2. Frey, Bruno S. & Meier, Stephan, 2004. "Pro-social behavior in a natural setting," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 65-88, May.
  3. Glenn W. Harrison & John A. List, 2004. "Field Experiments," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1009-1055, December.
  4. Ganzach, Yoav & Karsahi, Nili, 1995. "Message framing and buying behavior: A field experiment," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 11-17, January.
  5. Levin, Irwin P. & Schneider, Sandra L. & Gaeth, Gary J., 1998. "All Frames Are Not Created Equal: A Typology and Critical Analysis of Framing Effects," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 149-188, November.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Martin Dufwenberg & Simon Gaechter & Heike Hennig-Schmidt, 2010. "The Framing of Games and the Psychology of Play," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse15_2010, University of Bonn, Germany.
  2. Jefferson, Therese & Taplin, Ross, 2011. "An investigation of the endowment effect using a factorial design," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 899-907.
  3. Sebastian J. Goerg & Gari Walkowitz, 2010. "On the Prevalence of Framing Effects Across Subject-Pools in a Two- Person Cooperation Game," Working Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2010_28, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
  4. John A. List, 2011. "Does Market Experience Eliminate Market Anomalies? The Case of Exogenous Market Experience," NBER Working Papers 16908, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. John Smith, 2012. "The endogenous nature of the measurement of social preferences," Mind and Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 11(2), pages 235-256, December.
  6. Nathan Berg & G. Biele & Gerd Gigerenzer, 2013. "Does Consistency Predict Accuracy of Beliefs?: Economists Surveyed About PSA," Working Papers 1308, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2013.
  7. Ekström, Mathias, 2011. "Do Watching Eyes Affect Charitable Giving? Evidence from a Field Experiment," Research Papers in Economics 2011:28, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
  8. Martin Dufwenberg & Simon Gaechter & Heike Hennig-Schmidt, 2006. "The Framing of Games and the Psychology of Strategic Choice," Discussion Papers 2006-20, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
  9. Michał Krawczyk, 2012. "To answer or not to answer? A field test of loss aversion," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 29.
  10. Guido Baltussen & G. Post & Martijn Assem & Peter Wakker, 2012. "Random incentive systems in a dynamic choice experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 418-443, September.
  11. Friedel Bolle & Claudia Vogel, 2011. "Power comes with responsibility—or does it?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 148(3), pages 459-470, September.

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