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Is universal coverage a solution for disparities in health care?: Findings from three low-income provinces of Thailand

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  • Suraratdecha, Chutima
  • Saithanu, Somying
  • Tangcharoensathien, Viroj
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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V8X-4F4H9YF-1/2/097a448aae0fcb50e5f7acff5ded3598
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Health Policy.

    Volume (Year): 73 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 272-284

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:73:y:2005:i:3:p:272-284

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthpol

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Schoen, Cathy & Doty, Michelle M., 2004. "Inequities in access to medical care in five countries: findings from the 2001 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 309-322, March.
    2. Van de Ven, Wynand P. M. M. & Van Praag, Bernard M. S., 1981. "The demand for deductibles in private health insurance : A probit model with sample selection," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 229-252, November.
    3. Pannarunothai, Supasit & Mills, Anne, 1997. "The poor pay more: Health-related inequality in Thailand," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 44(12), pages 1781-1790, June.
    4. Dunlop, Sheryl & Coyte, Peter C. & McIsaac, Warren, 2000. "Socio-economic status and the utilisation of physicians' services: results from the Canadian National Population Health Survey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 123-133, July.
    5. Castro-Leal, Florencia & Dayton, Julia & Demery, Lionel & Mehra, Kalpana, 1999. "Public Social Spending in Africa: Do the Poor Benefit?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 49-72, February.
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    Cited by:
    1. Sandra G. Sosa-Rubi & Omar Galarraga & Jeffrey E. Harris, 2007. "Heterogeneous Impact of the "Seguro Popular" Program on the Utilization of Obstetrical Services in Mexico, 2001-2006: A Multinomial Probit Model with a Discrete Endogenous Variable," NBER Working Papers 13498, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Thoresen, Stian H. & Fielding, Angela, 2011. "Universal health care in Thailand: Concerns among the health care workforce," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 17-22, January.

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