Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Market behaviour with large amounts of intermittent generation

Contents:

Author Info

  • Green, Richard
  • Vasilakos, Nicholas

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impact of intermittent wind generation on hourly equilibrium prices and output, using data on expected wind generation capacity and demand for 2020. Hourly wind data for the period 1993-2005 are used to obtain wind output generation profiles for thirty regions (onshore and offshore) across Great Britain. Matching the wind profiles for each month to the actual hourly demand (scaled to possible 2020 values), we find that the volatility of prices will increase, and that there is significant year-to-year variation in generators' profits. Above-average wind speeds lead to below-average prices, but annual revenues for British wind generators (producing more in the winter) are almost as great as for base-load generators. In the presence of significant market power (the equivalent of two symmetric firms owning fossil-fuelled capacity, rather than six), the level of prices more than doubled, and their volatility increased. However, wind generators' average revenues rose by 20% less than those of base-load plant.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V2W-4X1XYN6-1/2/fecd74321fb6b60ab7ba0b3d89c94583
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
Issue (Month): 7 (July)
Pages: 3211-3220

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:7:p:3211-3220

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

Related research

Keywords: Electricity markets Imperfect competition Wind generation;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Green, Richard J & Joanne Evans, 2003. "Why did British electricity prices fall after 1998?," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 92, Royal Economic Society.
  2. Oswald, James & Raine, Mike & Ashraf-Ball, Hezlin, 2008. "Will British weather provide reliable electricity?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 3202-3215, August.
  3. Sinden, Graham, 2007. "Characteristics of the UK wind resource: Long-term patterns and relationship to electricity demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 112-127, January.
  4. Richard Green, 2008. "Carbon Tax or Carbon Permits: The Impact on Generators Risks," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 67-90.
  5. Sensfuß, Frank & Ragwitz, Mario & Genoese, Massimo, 2008. "The merit-order effect: A detailed analysis of the price effect of renewable electricity generation on spot market prices in Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 3076-3084, August.
  6. Holttinen, H., 2005. "Optimal electricity market for wind power," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(16), pages 2052-2063, November.
  7. Müsgens, F. & Neuhoff, K., 2006. "Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0610, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  8. Klemperer, Paul D & Meyer, Margaret A, 1989. "Supply Function Equilibria in Oligopoly under Uncertainty," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1243-77, November.
  9. Richard J. Green, 2008. "Electricity Wholesale Markets: Designs Now and in a Low-carbon Future," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 95-124.
  10. Green, Richard & Newbery, David M G, 1991. "Competition in the British Electricity Spot Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 557, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  11. Sáenz de Miera, Gonzalo & del Ri­o González, Pablo & Vizcaino, Ignacio, 2008. "Analysing the impact of renewable electricity support schemes on power prices: The case of wind electricity in Spain," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 3345-3359, September.
  12. Twomey, P. & Neuhoff, K., 2005. "Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0532, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Grünewald, Philipp & Cockerill, Tim & Contestabile, Marcello & Pearson, Peter, 2011. "The role of large scale storage in a GB low carbon energy future: Issues and policy challenges," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 4807-4815, September.
  2. Würzburg, Klaas & Labandeira, Xavier & Linares, Pedro, 2013. "Renewable generation and electricity prices: Taking stock and new evidence for Germany and Austria," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(S1), pages S159-S171.
  3. Lion Hirth, 2012. "The Market Value of Variable Renewables," Working Papers 2012.15, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  4. Godby, Robert & Torell, Greg & Coupal, Roger, 2013. "Estimating the value of additional wind and transmission capacity in the rocky mountain west," MPRA Paper 47026, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Schaber, Katrin & Steinke, Florian & Hamacher, Thomas, 2012. "Transmission grid extensions for the integration of variable renewable energies in Europe: Who benefits where?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 123-135.
  6. Green, Richard & Vasilakos, Nicholas, 2011. "The economics of offshore wind," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 496-502, February.
  7. Green, Richard, 2010. "Are the British electricity trading and transmission arrangements future-proof?," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 186-194, December.
  8. Kamiński, Jacek, 2014. "A blocked takeover in the Polish power sector: A model-based analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 42-52.
  9. Woo, C.K. & Horowitz, I. & Moore, J. & Pacheco, A., 2011. "The impact of wind generation on the electricity spot-market price level and variance: The Texas experience," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 3939-3944, July.
  10. Forrest, Sam & MacGill, Iain, 2013. "Assessing the impact of wind generation on wholesale prices and generator dispatch in the Australian National Electricity Market," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 120-132.
  11. Narbel, Patrick A., 2014. "Rethinking how to support intermittent renewables," Discussion Papers 2014/17, Department of Business and Management Science, Norwegian School of Economics.
  12. Dallinger, David, 2013. "The contribution of vehicle-to-grid to balance fluctuating generation: Comparing different battery ageing approaches," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S9/2013, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
  13. Jean-Luc Gaffard & Mauro Napoletano, 2012. "Agent-based models and economic policy," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/53r60a8s3ku, Sciences Po.
  14. Darghouth, Naïm R. & Barbose, Galen & Wiser, Ryan H., 2014. "Customer-economics of residential photovoltaic systems (Part 1): The impact of high renewable energy penetrations on electricity bill savings with net metering," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 290-300.
  15. Simoglou, Christos K. & Biskas, Pandelis N. & Vagropoulos, Stylianos I. & Bakirtzis, Anastasios G., 2014. "Electricity market models and RES integration: The Greek case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 531-542.
  16. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/53r60a8s3kup1vc9l564igg8g is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Lion Hirth, 2013. "The Market Value of Variable Renewables. The Effect of Solar and Wind Power Variability on their Relative Price," RSCAS Working Papers 2013/36, European University Institute.
  18. Green, Richard & Hu, Helen & Vasilakos, Nicholas, 2011. "Turning the wind into hydrogen: The long-run impact on electricity prices and generating capacity," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 3992-3998, July.
  19. Böckers, Veit & Giessing, Leonie & Rösch, Jürgen, 2013. "The green game changer: An empirical assessment of the effects of wind and solar power on the merit order," DICE Discussion Papers 104, Heinrich‐Heine‐Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:7:p:3211-3220. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.