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Causal relationship between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth: A multi-country analysis

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  • Yoo, Seung-Hoon
  • Ku, Se-Ju
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    Abstract

    This paper attempts to investigate the causal relationship between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth using the data from six countries among 20 countries that have used nuclear energy for more than 20 years until 2005. To this end, time-series techniques including the tests for unit roots, co-integration, and Granger-causality are employed to Argentina, France, Germany, Korea, Pakistan, and Switzerland. The main conclusion is that the causal relationship between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth is not uniform across countries. In the case of Switzerland, there exists bi-directional causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth. This means that an increase in nuclear energy consumption directly affects economic growth and that economic growth also stimulates further nuclear energy consumption. The uni-directional causality runs from economic growth to nuclear energy consumption without any feedback effects in France and Pakistan, and from nuclear energy to economic growth in Korea. However, any causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in Argentina and Germany is not detected.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 5 (May)
    Pages: 1905-1913

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:5:p:1905-1913

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

    Related research

    Keywords: Nuclear energy consumption Economic growth Causality;

    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Nazlioglu, Saban & Lebe, Fuat & Kayhan, Selim, 2011. "Nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in OECD countries: Cross-sectionally dependent heterogeneous panel causality analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 6615-6621, October.
    2. Marktanner, Marcus & Salman, Lana, 2011. "Economic and geopolitical dimensions of renewable vs. nuclear energy in North Africa," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 4479-4489, August.
    3. Filiz OZKAN, & Ă–mer OZKAN, & Huseyin Serdar KUYUK, 2012. "Energy Production And Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence From Turkey," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 12(2).
    4. Wolde-Rufael, Yemane & Menyah, Kojo, 2010. "Nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in nine developed countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 550-556, May.
    5. Anis Omri & Anissa Chaibi, 2014. "Nuclear energy, renewable energy, and economic growth in developed and developing countries : A modelling analysis from simultaneous-equation models," Working Papers 2014-188, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    6. Apergis, Nicholas & Payne, James E., 2010. "A panel study of nuclear energy consumption and economic growth," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 545-549, May.
    7. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chiu, Yi-Bin, 2011. "Oil prices, nuclear energy consumption, and economic growth: New evidence using a heterogeneous panel analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 2111-2120, April.
    8. Wong, Siang Leng & Chang, Youngho & Chia, Wai-Mun, 2013. "Energy consumption, energy R&D and real GDP in OECD countries with and without oil reserves," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 51-60.
    9. Hanan Naser, 2014. "Oil Market, Nuclear Energy Consumption and Economic Growth: Evidence from Emerging Economies," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 4(2), pages 288-296.
    10. Pradhan, Rudra P. & Bagchi, Tapan P., 2013. "Effect of transportation infrastructure on economic growth in India: The VECM approach," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 139-148.
    11. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chiu, Yi-Bin, 2011. "Nuclear energy consumption, oil prices, and economic growth: Evidence from highly industrialized countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 236-248, March.
    12. Van Hoa, Tran & Limskul, Kitti, 2013. "Economic impact of CO2 emissions on Thailand's growth and climate change mitigation policy: A modelling analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 651-658.

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