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Neighborhood wealth distributions

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  • Ioannides, Yannis M.
  • Seslen, Tracey N.

Abstract

This paper uses data from the neighborhood clusters sample of the 1989 American Housing Survey and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and its 1989 wealth supplement to study the distribution of wealth within US residential neighborhoods. It uses the Bourguignon decomposable inequality index and finds that wealth is more unequally distributed than income, and income more than housing wealth, at all levels of aggregation, that is, neighborhoods, metropolitan areas, regions and the entire US.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V84-45NY3TB-1/2/2a0cd81602aa2fad2c6406c1bd74b56e
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 76 (2002)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 357-367

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:76:y:2002:i:3:p:357-367

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References

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  1. Dennis Epple & Thomas Romer & Holger Sieg, 2001. "Interjurisdictional Sorting and Majority Rule: An Empirical Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(6), pages 1437-1465, November.
  2. Bourguignon, Francois, 1979. "Decomposable Income Inequality Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(4), pages 901-20, July.
  3. Yannis Ioannides, 2001. "Neighborhood Income Distributions," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0103, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  4. Dennis Epple & Holger Sieg, 1999. "Estimating Equilibrium Models of Local Jurisdictions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(4), pages 645-681, August.
  5. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416.
  6. James E. Foster & Artyom A. Shneyerov, 1999. "A general class of additively decomposable inequality measures," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 89-111.
  7. Kiel, K.A. & Zabel, J.E., 1998. "The Impact of Neighborhood Characteristics ou House Prices: What Geographic Area Constitutes a Neighborhodd?," Papers 98-04, Wellesley College - Department of Economics.
  8. Shorrocks, A F, 1980. "The Class of Additively Decomposable Inequality Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(3), pages 613-25, April.
  9. Epple, Dennis & Platt, Glenn J., 1998. "Equilibrium and Local Redistribution in an Urban Economy when Households Differ in both Preferences and Incomes," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 23-51, January.
  10. Schelling, Thomas C, 1969. "Models of Segregation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 488-93, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Rady, Sven & Ortalo-Magné, François, 2002. "Homeownership," Discussion Papers in Economics 28, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  2. Christopher H. Wheeler & Elizabeth A. La Jeunesse, 2007. "Neighborhood income inequality," Working Papers 2006-039, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  3. Francois Ortalo-Magne & Sven Rady, 2002. "Homeownership: Low Household Mobility, Volatile Housing Prices, High Income Dispersion," CESifo Working Paper Series 823, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Daniel Richards, 2004. "Price Discrimination and the Long Boom," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0419, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  5. François Ortalo-Magné & Sven Rady, . "Homeownership: Volatile Housing Prices, Low Labor Mobility and High Income Dispersion," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 02-04, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.

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