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Does household income matter for children's schooling? Evidence for rural Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Grimm, Michael

Abstract

Abstract Household income has been shown to matter for children's school enrolment, in particular in settings where households face tight liquidity constraints caused by the lack of insurance and limited possibilities to smooth consumption through credit and savings. However, so far only few studies have made an effort to quantify the income elasticity of school enrolment, in particular in the Sub-Saharan African context. The empirical problem in identifying the causal impact of income on enrolment is to control for parental ability, which is largely unobserved, and to deal with reverse causality and measurement error. This paper uses for identification a natural experiment in Burkina Faso, a country with particularly low enrolment rates. The results show that naive estimates largely underestimate the true income elasticity of school enrolment. The results can provide a basis for safety net policies.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (August)
Pages: 740-754

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:30:y:2011:i:4:p:740-754

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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Keywords: School enrolment Economic crisis Sub-Saharan Africa;

References

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  7. Gunther, Isabel & Grimm, Michael, 2007. "Measuring pro-poor growth when relative prices shift," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 245-256, January.
  8. Yamano, Takashi & Alderman, Harold & Christiaensen, Luc J.M., 2003. "Child Growth, Shocks, And Food Aid In Rural Ethiopia," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25838, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Rud, Iryna & Van Klaveren, Chris & Groot, Wim & Maassen van den Brink, Henriëtte, 2014. "The externalities of crime: The effect of criminal involvement of parents on the educational attainment of their children," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 89-103.
  2. Stuart Cameron & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2012. "Education, Urban Poverty and Migration: Evidence from Bangladesh and Vietnam," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa679, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
  3. Chowa, Gina A.N. & Masa, Rainier D. & Wretman, Christopher J. & Ansong, David, 2013. "The impact of household possessions on youth's academic achievement in the Ghana Youthsave experiment: A propensity score analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 69-81.
  4. Lindskog, Annika, 2013. "The effect of siblings’ education on school-entry in the Ethiopian highlands," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 45-68.

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