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Who goes to graduate/professional school? The importance of economic fluctuations, undergraduate field, and ability

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  • Bedard, Kelly
  • Herman, Douglas A.

Abstract

This study examines the impact of fluctuations in entry-level labor market conditions on the graduate school enrollment decisions of newly minted undergraduate degree holders. Using repeated cross-section data for recently graduated science and engineering undergraduates from the National Survey of Recent College Graduates, and state-level unemployment rates to measure entry-level labor market conditions, we find that advanced degree enrollment patterns vary across the business cycle by undergraduate major, GPA, gender, and advanced degree type.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VB9-4N25VX4-4/1/1b4c2a93764b86f66a2b8fee6d9871df
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 27 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 197-210

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:27:y:2008:i:2:p:197-210

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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References

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  1. Light, Audrey, 1995. "Hazard model estimates of the decision to reenroll in school," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 381-406, December.
  2. Plutarchos Sakellaris & Antonio Spilimbergo, 1999. "Business Cycles and Investment in Human Capital: International Evidence on Higher Education," Electronic Working Papers 99-009, University of Maryland, Department of Economics.
  3. Harris Dellas & Plutarchos Sakellaris, 2003. "On the cyclicality of schooling: theory and evidence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 55(1), pages 148-172, January.
  4. Eide, Eric & Waehrer, Geetha, 1998. "The Role of the Option Value of College Attendance in College Major Choice," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 73-82, February.
  5. Montgomery, Mark, 2002. "A nested logit model of the choice of a graduate business school," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 471-480, October.
  6. Berger, Mark C. & Kostal, Thomas, 2002. "Financial resources, regulation, and enrollment in US public higher education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 101-110, April.
  7. Pissarides, Christopher A, 1981. "Staying-on at School in England and Wales," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 48(192), pages 345-63, November.
  8. Julian R. Betts & Laurel L. McFarland, 1995. "Safe Port in a Storm: The Impact of Labor Market Conditions on Community College Enrollments," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(4), pages 741-765.
  9. Pissarides, Christopher A, 1982. "From School to University: The Demand for Post-Compulsory Education in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(367), pages 654-67, September.
  10. Rice, Patricia G, 1987. "The Demand for Post-compulsory Education in the UK and the Effects of Educational Maintenance Allowances," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 54(216), pages 465-75, November.
  11. Ai, Chunrong & Norton, Edward C., 2003. "Interaction terms in logit and probit models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 123-129, July.
  12. Lehr, Dona K & Newton, Jan M, 1978. "Time Series and Cross-Sectional Investigations of the Demand for Higher Education," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(3), pages 411-22, July.
  13. Dellas, Harris & Koubi, Vally, 2003. "Business cycles and schooling," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 843-859, November.
  14. David Neumark & William Wascher, 1995. "The Effects of Minimum Wages on Teenage Employment and Enrollment: Evidence from Matched CPS Surveys," NBER Working Papers 5092, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Ehrenberg, Ronald G, 1992. "The Flow of New Doctorates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 830-75, June.
  16. Hope Corman, 1983. "Postsecondary Education Enrollment Responses by Recent High School Graduates and Older Adults," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 18(2), pages 247-267.
  17. Kane, Thomas J, 1994. "College Entry by Blacks since 1970: The Role of College Costs, Family Background, and the Returns to Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(5), pages 878-911, October.
  18. Gustman, Alan L & Steinmeier, Thomas L, 1981. "The Impact of Wages and Unemployment on Youth Enrollment and Labor Supply," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(4), pages 553-60, November.
  19. Sandra E. Black & Amir Sufi, 2002. "Who Goes to College? Differential Enrollment by Race and Family Background," NBER Working Papers 9310, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. John P. Conley & Ali Sina Onder & Benno Torgler, 2012. "Are all High-Skilled Coherts Created Equal? Unemployment, Gender, and Research Productivity," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 293, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
  2. Bednar, Steven & Gicheva, Dora, 2013. "Tax benefits for graduate education: Incentives for whom?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 181-197.
  3. Stevenson, Adam, 2012. "The Male-Female Gap in Post-Baccalaureate School Quality," MPRA Paper 36533, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Johnson, Matthew T., 2013. "The impact of business cycle fluctuations on graduate school enrollment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 122-134.
  5. Boehm, Michael J. & Watzinger, Martin, 2010. "The Allocation of Talent: Evidence from the Market of Economists," MPRA Paper 27463, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Fethke, Gary, 2011. "A low-subsidy problem in public higher education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 617-626, August.
  7. Boehm, Michael J. & Watzinger, Martin, 2010. "The Selection of Skills into Sectors: Evidence from the Market for Economists," MPRA Paper 23315, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Javier García-Estévez & Néstor Duch-Brown, 2012. "Student graduation: to what extent does university expenditure matter?," Working Papers 2012/4, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  9. Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2013. "Endogenous Cycles and Human Capital," Discussion Papers in Economics 13/18, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.

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