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From duty to right: The role of public education in the transition to aging societies

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  • Sugimoto, Yoshiaki
  • Nakagawa, Masao

Abstract

This paper argues that the introduction of compulsory schooling in early industrialization promoted the growth process that eventually led to a vicious cycle of population aging and negative pressure on education policy. In the early phases of industrialization, public education was undesirable for the young poor who relied on child labor. Compulsory schooling therefore discouraged childbirth, while the accompanying industrialization stimulated their demand for education. The subsequent rise in the share of the old population, however, limited government resources for education, placing heavier financial burdens on the young. This induced further fertility decline and population aging, and the resulting cycle may have delayed the growth of advanced economies in the last few decades.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 91 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 140-154

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:91:y:2010:i:1:p:140-154

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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Keywords: Compulsory education Fertility Generational conflict Growth;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Sugimoto, Yoshiaki & Nakagawa, Masao, 2009. "From Duty to Right: The Role of Public Education in the Transition to Aging Societies," MPRA Paper 13835, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Vogel, Edgar, 2011. "Human Capital and the Demographic Transition: Why Schooling Became Optimal," MEA discussion paper series 11247, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.

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