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The emergence and spatial distribution of Chinese seaport cities

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  • Funke, Michael
  • Yu, Hao

Abstract

Seaports have historically played a key role in facilitating trade and growth. This paper is the first attempt in the literature to analyse the formation of Chinese seaport cities and the dynamics that drives it. First, we aim to identify theoretically the emergence of urbanized seaports with the help of a formal economic geography model. Second, employing an empirically plausible parameterisation of the model, we calibrate the evolutionary process and spatial distribution of seaports along the Chinese coastline.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 22 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 196-209

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Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:22:y:2011:i:2:p:196-209

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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Keywords: Seaports Cities Economic geography model China;

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  1. Kris James Mitchener & Se Yan, 2010. "Globalization, Trade & Wages: What Does History tell us about China?," NBER Working Papers 15679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Nathan Nunn & Leonard Wantchekon, 2011. "The Slave Trade and the Origins of Mistrust in Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3221-52, December.
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  5. Masahisa Fujita & Paul Krugman, 2003. "The new economic geography: Past, present and the future," Papers in Regional Science, Springer, vol. 83(1), pages 139-164, October.
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  8. Mori, Tomoya & Nishikimi, Koji, 2002. "Economies of transport density and industrial agglomeration," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 167-200, March.
  9. Demurger, Sylvie, 2001. "Infrastructure Development and Economic Growth: An Explanation for Regional Disparities in China?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 95-117, March.
  10. Kristian Behrens & Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, 2011. "Tempora mutantur : in search of a new testament for NEG," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 215-230, March.
  11. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 2009. "The Economics of Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 9780262012638, December.
  12. Tetsu Kawakami & Masayuki Doi, 2004. "Port capital formation and economic development in Japan: A vector autoregression approach," Papers in Regional Science, Springer, vol. 83(4), pages 723-732, October.
  13. Tetsu Kawakami & Masayuki Doi, 2004. "Port capital formation and economic development in Japan: A vector autoregression approach," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 83(4), pages 723-732, October.
  14. Fujita, Masahisa & Mori, Tomoya, 1996. "The role of ports in the making of major cities: Self-agglomeration and hub-effect," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 93-120, April.
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