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Enabling natural resource managers to self-assess their adaptive capacity

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Author Info

  • Brown, Peter R.
  • Nelson, Rohan
  • Jacobs, Brent
  • Kokic, Phil
  • Tracey, Jacquie
  • Ahmed, Mehnaz
  • DeVoil, Peter
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    Abstract

    We describe the development of a low cost, repeatable self-assessment process enabling community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) groups to set priorities for building their capacity to adopt sustainable farming practices and adapt to global change. Regional measures of adaptive capacity derived from rural livelihoods analysis were populated with secondary data and used to communicate the multiple dimensions of adaptive capacity to groups of landowners. This conceptual framework was then used to derive locally relevant measures of adaptive capacity via focus groups drawn from pre-existing networks of land managers. The key issue discussed at the workshop was what constrained or enabled private land managers to effectively manage natural resources. This self-assessment process was designed to support dialogue between CBNRM groups, industry and governments to prioritise collective action for building adaptive capacity. The approach was piloted with CBNRM groups across New South Wales, Australia.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6T3W-50G75M2-3/2/8d46835e68865e765fecfa4ff6e8e7ed
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Agricultural Systems.

    Volume (Year): 103 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 8 (October)
    Pages: 562-568

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:agisys:v:103:y:2010:i:8:p:562-568

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/agsy

    Related research

    Keywords: Adaptive capacity Community Farming Land managers Natural resource management Rural livelihoods analysis;

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    1. Anil Markandya & S. Pedroso, 2005. "How Substitutable is Natural Capital?," Working Papers 2005.88, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    2. Norton, Bryan G., 1995. "Evaluating ecosystem states: Two competing paradigms," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 113-127, August.
    3. Ellis, Frank, 2000. "Rural Livelihoods and Diversity in Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296966.
    4. S. Eriksen & P. Kelly, 2007. "Developing Credible Vulnerability Indicators for Climate Adaptation Policy Assessment," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 495-524, May.
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