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The Effects of No Child Left Behind on Student Performance in Alabama’s Rural Schools

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  • Henry W. KINNUCAN
  • Martin D. SMITH
  • Yuqing ZHENG
  • Jose R. LLANES

Abstract

County level data for the period 1999-2007 are used to assess the effects of NCLB on student performance in Alabama’s rural schools. Results suggest revisions to the state’s accountability system associated with the Act had a positive effect on 8th grade test scores for language, and for test score gains in language between the 4th and 8th grades. However, the measured effects on test scores for reading and math are mostly zero or negative. This suggests NCLB failed in its major objective, which was to enhance students’ proficiency in math and reading.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Euro-American Association of Economic Development in its journal Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies.

Volume (Year): 12 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 5-24

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Handle: RePEc:eaa:eerese:v:12:y2012:i:1_1

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Related research

Keywords: dynamic panel data model; education production function; No Child Left Behind; rural schools; student performance;

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References

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  1. Rosalind Levacic & Anna Vignoles, 2002. "Researching the Links between School Resources and Student Outcomes in the UK: A Review of Issues and Evidence," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 313-331.
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