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Labor Productivity Growth in the Kansas Farm Sector: A Tripartite Decomposition Using a Non-Parametric Approach

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  • Mugera, Amin W.
  • Langemeier, Michael R.
  • Featherstone, Allen M.

Abstract

We use nonparametric production function methods to decompose farm-level labor productivity growth into components attributable to efficiency change, technical change, and factor intensity. The estimation is accomplished using balanced panel data drawn from the Kansas Farm Management Association for the period 1993 to 2007. We find that labor productivity growth is primarily driven by factor intensity and technical change. Efficiency change is declining with increasing productivity growth, and technical change is not Hicks-neutral and occurs at high levels of factor intensity, suggesting that innovation is embodied in factor intensity.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association in its journal Agricultural and Resource Economics Review.

Volume (Year): 41 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (December)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:141667

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Web page: http://www.narea.org/
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Keywords: labor productivity growth; efficiency change; technical change; factor intensity; Agricultural and Food Policy; Farm Management; Production Economics; Productivity Analysis;

References

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  1. Fuglie, Keith O. & MacDonald, James C. & Ball, V. Eldon, 2007. "Productivity Growth in U.S. Agriculture," Economic Brief 6382, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  2. Daniel J. Henderson & Valentin Zelenyuk, 2007. "Testing for (Efficiency) Catching-up," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 1003–1019, April.
  3. Serra, Teresa & Zilberman, David & Gil, Jose Maria, 2007. "Farms' Technical Inefficiencies in the Presence of Government Programs," 2007 Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland, Oregon TN 9952, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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  7. Huffman, Wallace & Evenson, Robert E., 1992. "Contributions of Public and Private Science and Technology to U.S. Agricultural Productivity," Staff General Research Papers 10990, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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  9. Boris Bravo-Ureta & Daniel Solís & Víctor Moreira López & José Maripani & Abdourahmane Thiam & Teodoro Rivas, 2007. "Technical efficiency in farming: a meta-regression analysis," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 57-72, February.
  10. V. Eldon Ball & Charles Hallahan & Richard Nehring, 2004. "Convergence of Productivity: An Analysis of the Catch-up Hypothesis within a Panel of States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1315-1321.
  11. Seaver, Bill L & Triantis, Konstantinos P, 1989. "The Implications of Using Messy Data to Estimate Production-Frontier-Based Technical Efficiency Measures," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 7(1), pages 49-59, January.
  12. M-super-a Jes�s Delgado-Rodríguez & Inmaculada �lvarez-Ayuso, 2008. "Economic Growth and Convergence of EU Member States: An Empirical Investigation," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(3), pages 486-497, 08.
  13. Weber, William L. & Domazlicky, Bruce R., 2006. "Capital Deepening and Manufacturing's Contribution to Regional Economic Convergence," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 36(1).
  14. Craig S. Hakkio, 2008. "PCE and CPI inflation differentials: converting inflation forecasts," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q I, pages 51-68.
  15. Albert K. A. Acquaye & Julian M. Alston & Philip G. Pardey, 2003. "Post-War Productivity Patterns in U.S. Agriculture: Influences of Aggregation Procedures in a State-Level Analysis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(1), pages 59-80.
  16. Teresa Serra & Barry K. Goodwin & Allen M. Featherstone, 2005. "Agricultural Policy Reform and Off-farm Labour Decisions," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(2), pages 271-285.
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