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The National Longitudinal Surveys

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  • Michael R. Pergamit
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    Abstract

    This article describes the design features and topical coverage of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS). The NLS are perhaps the oldest and most widely used panel surveys of individuals in the United States. These surveys were started in the mid-1960s to exam employment issues faced by different cohorts of the U.S. population. Since then, the NLS surveys have expanded to include two new cohorts of youth. Survey topic areas include employment, education, training, family relationships, financial well-being, and health. Information on data access is also provided.

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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.15.2.239
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Perspectives.

    Volume (Year): 15 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 2 (Spring)
    Pages: 239-253

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    Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:15:y:2001:i:2:p:239-253

    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.15.2.239
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    5. repec:eme:rlepps:v:18:y:1999:i:1999:p:403-438 is not listed on IDEAS
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    7. Michael R. Pergamit & Jonathan R. Veum, 1999. "What is a promotion?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(4), pages 581-601, July.
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    18. Susan Averett & Sanders Korenman, 1996. "The Economic Reality of the Beauty Myth," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(2), pages 304-330.
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    20. Stacy Dickert-Conlin & Amitabh Chandra, 1999. "Taxes and the Timing of Birth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(1), pages 161-177, February.
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