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Conscription and Crime: Evidence from the Argentine Draft Lottery

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  • Sebastian Galiani
  • Mart�n A. Rossi
  • Ernesto Schargrodsky

Abstract

We estimate the causal effect of mandatory participation in military service on individuals' subsequent involvement in criminal activities. To identify this causal effect, we exploit the random assignment of young men to conscription in Argentina through a draft lottery. Using a dataset that includes draft eligibility, participation in military service, and criminal records, we find that conscription increases the likelihood of developing a criminal record. The effects are significant not only for cohorts that provided military service during wartime, but also for those that served during peacetime. Our results do not support the introduction of conscription for anti-crime purposes. JEL (H56, K42, O17)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Journal: Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 3 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 119-36

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aejapp:v:3:y:2011:i:2:p:119-36

Note: DOI: 10.1257/app.3.2.119
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  1. Joshua Angrist & Stacey Chen & Brigham Frandsen, 2009. "Did Vietnam Veterans Get Sicker in the 1990s? The Complicated Effects of Military Service on Self-Reported Health," Working Papers 09-19, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  2. Joshua D. Angrist & Stacey H. Chen, 2007. "Long-term consequences of vietnam-era conscription: schooling, experience, and earnings," NBER Working Papers 13411, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Joshua Angrist, 1989. "Lifetime Earnings and the Vietnam Era Draft Lottery: Evidence from Social Security Administrative Records," Working Papers, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. 631, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  4. Richard B. Freeman, 1996. "Why Do So Many Young American Men Commit Crimes and What Might We Do about It?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 25-42, Winter.
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  18. Angrist, Joshua & Chen, Stacey, 2008. "Long-Term Economic Consequences of Vietnam-Era Conscription: Schooling, Experience and Earnings," IZA Discussion Papers 3628, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Conscription and Crime: Evidence from the Argentine Draft Lottery
    by Ariel Goldring in Free Market Mojo on 2010-05-30 07:13:37
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Cited by:
  1. Baldwin, Kate & Bhavnani, Rikhil R., 2013. "Ancillary experiments: Opportunities and challenges," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Card, David & Cardoso, Ana Rute, 2011. "Can Compulsory Military Service Raise Civilian Wages? Evidence from the Peacetime Draft in Portugal," IZA Discussion Papers 5915, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. David Card & Ana Rute Cardoso, 2011. "Can Compulsory Military Service Increase Civilian Wages? Evidence from the Peacetime Draft in Portugal," NBER Working Papers 17694, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Peter Siminski & Simon Ville & Alexander Paull, 2013. "Does the Military Train Men to be Violent Criminals? New Evidence from Australia’s Conscription Lotteries," Economics Working Papers, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia wp13-01, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
  5. Albæk, Karsten & Leth-Petersen, Søren & le Maire, Daniel & Tranæs, Torben, 2013. "Does Peacetime Military Service Affect Crime?," IZA Discussion Papers 7528, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Poutvaara, Panu & Wagener, Andreas, 2011. "Ending military conscription," Munich Reprints in Economics, University of Munich, Department of Economics 19821, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  7. Jha, Saumitra & Wilkinson, Steven, 2012. "Veterans, Organizational Skill and Ethnic Cleansing: Evidence from the Partition of South Asia," Research Papers, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business 2092, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.

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