IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/fribis/022020en.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Globalization, Environmental Damage and the Corona Pandemic – Lessons from the Crisis for Economic, Environmental and Social Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Blum, Bianca
  • Neumärker, Bernhard

Abstract

The rapidly expanding corona pandemic in 2020 has largely brought the world to an economic stagnation. The impact on the environment, especially on air quality, from almost suspended air traffic, idle industry and economic lockdown is enormous, but also the economic and social consequences of the crisis. This state of stagnation hardly appears to be economically and socially sustainable. However, we should ask ourselves right now what we can learn from the situation in order to question globalization, better intercept future comparable crisis situations and take the step towards more sustainable development on an ecological, economic and social basis. The paper identifies the areas of externality management to improve environmental quality, digitalization and network expansion as well as basic income as central concepts that need to be addressed in and after the crisis. Concrete concepts are suggested and discussed at the end of the paper.

Suggested Citation

  • Blum, Bianca & Neumärker, Bernhard, 2020. "Globalization, Environmental Damage and the Corona Pandemic – Lessons from the Crisis for Economic, Environmental and Social Policy," FRIBIS Discussion Paper Series 02-2020 EN, University of Freiburg, Freiburg Institute for Basic Income Studies (FRIBIS).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:fribis:022020en
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/227669/1/fribis-dp02-2020en.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. van den Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M., 2011. "Environment versus growth -- A criticism of "degrowth" and a plea for "a-growth"," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(5), pages 881-890, March.
    2. Matteo Lucchese & Mario Pianta, 2020. "The Coming Coronavirus Crisis: What Can We Learn?," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 55(2), pages 98-104, March.
    3. Janet Ranganathan & Daniel Vennard, 2016. "Shifting Diets for a Sustainable Food Future," Working Papers id:10890, eSocialSciences.
    4. Palermo Kuss Ana Helena & Neumärker K. J. Bernhard, 2018. "Modelling the Time Allocation Effects of Basic Income," Basic Income Studies, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 1-15, December.
    5. Qiangyu Lu, 2020. "It Is What It Is," Economy and Social Inclusion, in: William P. Alford & Mei Liao & Fengming Cui (ed.), An Oral History of the Special Olympics in China Volume 3, pages 69-93, Springer.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wolfgang Brozek & Christof Falkenberg, 2021. "Industrial Animal Farming and Zoonotic Risk: COVID-19 as a Gateway to Sustainable Change? A Scoping Study," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(16), pages 1-30, August.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Blum, Bianca & Neumärker, Bernhard, 2020. "Globalization, Environmental Damage and the Corona Pandemic – Lessons from the Crisis for Economic, Environmental and Social Policy (German Version)," FRIBIS Discussion Paper Series 02-2020 DE, University of Freiburg, Freiburg Institute for Basic Income Studies (FRIBIS).
    2. Blum, Bianca & Neumärker, Karl Justus Bernhard, 2020. "Globalization, environmental damage and the Corona pandemic: Lessons from the crisis for economic, environmental and social policy," The Constitutional Economics Network Working Papers 02-2020, University of Freiburg, Department of Economic Policy and Constitutional Economic Theory.
    3. Bianca Blum & Bernhard K. J. Neumärker, 2021. "Lessons from Globalization and the COVID-19 Pandemic for Economic, Environmental and Social Policy," World, MDPI, vol. 2(2), pages 1-26, June.
    4. Albert, Osei-Owusu Kwame & Marianne, Thomsen & Jonathan, Lindahl & Nino, Javakhishvili Larsen & Dario, Caro, 2020. "Tracking the carbon emissions of Denmark's five regions from a producer and consumer perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 177(C).
    5. Lange, Steffen & Pohl, Johanna & Santarius, Tilman, 2020. "Digitalization and energy consumption. Does ICT reduce energy demand?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 176(C).
    6. Olimpia Neagu, 2019. "The Link between Economic Complexity and Carbon Emissions in the European Union Countries: A Model Based on the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(17), pages 1-27, August.
    7. Katsu Masaki, 2022. "Exploring the ‘Partial Connections’ between Growth and Degrowth Debates: Bhutan’s Policy of Gross National Happiness," Journal of Interdisciplinary Economics, , vol. 34(1), pages 86-103, January.
    8. Jeroen C.J.M. van den Bergh, 2014. "Sustainable development in ecological economics," Chapters, in: Giles Atkinson & Simon Dietz & Eric Neumayer & Matthew Agarwala (ed.), Handbook of Sustainable Development, chapter 3, pages 41-54, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Thomas Döring & Birgit Aigner-Walder, 2022. "The Limits to Growth — 50 Years Ago and Today," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 57(3), pages 187-191, May.
    10. David Bryngelsson & Fredrik Hedenus & Daniel J. A. Johansson & Christian Azar & Stefan Wirsenius, 2017. "How Do Dietary Choices Influence the Energy-System Cost of Stabilizing the Climate?," Energies, MDPI, vol. 10(2), pages 1-13, February.
    11. Nhu Tuyên Lê & Marjolijn Bloemmen & Roxana Bobulescu & Claudio Vitari, 2015. "Microeconomic degrowth: The case of Community Supported Agriculture," Post-Print halshs-01923276, HAL.
    12. Luca Aquilanti & Silvia Gallegati & Valerio Temperini & Luigi Ferrante & Edlira Skrami & Maurizio Procaccini & Giorgio Rappelli, 2020. "Italian Response to Coronavirus Pandemic in Dental Care Access: The DeCADE Study," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 17(19), pages 1-12, September.
    13. Mark G. Edwards, 2021. "The growth paradox, sustainable development, and business strategy," Business Strategy and the Environment, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(7), pages 3079-3094, November.
    14. Meghan Beck-O’Brien & Stefan Bringezu, 2021. "Biodiversity Monitoring in Long-Distance Food Supply Chains: Tools, Gaps and Needs to Meet Business Requirements and Sustainability Goals," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(15), pages 1-23, July.
    15. Kovac Mitja & Elkanawati Amira & Gjikolli Vita & Vandenberghe Ann-Sophie, 2020. "The Covid-19 pandemic: collective action and European public policy under stress," Central European Journal of Public Policy, Sciendo, vol. 14(2), pages 47-59, December.
    16. Bert Scholtens, 2011. "The sustainability of green funds," Natural Resources Forum, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(3), pages 223-232, August.
    17. Marco Capasso, 2021. "Degrowth or Green Growth: A Reflection on the Recent Public Discourse in Norway," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(2), pages 1-15, January.
    18. Anderson, Blake & M'Gonigle, Michael, 2012. "Does ecological economics have a future?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 37-48.
    19. Sandra Waddock, 2016. "Foundational Memes for a New Narrative About the Role of Business in Society," Humanistic Management Journal, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 91-105, September.
    20. Marianna Gilli & Massimiliano Mazzanti, 2019. "Contextualising Sustainability: Socio-Economic Dynamics, Technology and Policies," SEEDS Working Papers 0419, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised Mar 2019.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corona crisis management; basic income; environmental politics; pandemics; globalization; public policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H12 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Crisis Management
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:fribis:022020en. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/wffrede.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/wffrede.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.