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Financial liberalization and the relationship-specificity of exports

Author

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  • Defever, Fabrice
  • Suedekum, Jens

Abstract

We investigate the causal impact of equity market liberalizations on sectoral export performance across 91 countries (1980 - 1997). The increased availability of external finance has boosted trade of industries that intensively use relationship-specific inputs, and lowered exports of industries using standardized inputs.

Suggested Citation

  • Defever, Fabrice & Suedekum, Jens, 2013. "Financial liberalization and the relationship-specificity of exports," DICE Discussion Papers 124, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:dicedp:124
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pol Antràs & Ricardo J. Caballero, 2009. "Trade and Capital Flows: A Financial Frictions Perspective," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 117(4), pages 701-744, August.
    2. Nathan Nunn, 2007. "Relationship-Specificity, Incomplete Contracts, and the Pattern of Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(2), pages 569-600.
    3. Rauch, James E., 1999. "Networks versus markets in international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 7-35, June.
    4. Pol Antràs & Mihir A. Desai & C. Fritz Foley, 2009. "Multinational Firms, FDI Flows, and Imperfect Capital Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1171-1219.
    5. Manova, Kalina, 2008. "Credit constraints, equity market liberalizations and international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 33-47, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial liberalization; credit constraints; relationship-specificity; international trade;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

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