IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zar/wpaper/dt2005-09.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Migration dynamics, growth and convergence

Author

Listed:
  • Gemma Larramona

    (Department of Economic Analysis. Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales. University of Zaragoza.)

  • Marcos Sanso

    () (Department of Economic Analysis. Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales. University of Zaragoza.)

Abstract

The aim of the present paper is to analyze the impact of migration dynamics on economic growth and convergence in terms of both the capital/labor ratio and wages. From our results, the following main conclusions can be highlighted: 1) migration positively affects the sending country because of the improvement in the capital/labor ratio and the savings of returning workers; 2) the differences existing between countries do not necessarily disappear in the long term, so the convergence that arises is limited or conditional because it does not necessarily imply an equalization of per capita income, capital/labor ratio, and wages, or the disappearance of migration; and 3) the possibility of migratory flow reversion cannot be excluded in the transitory dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Gemma Larramona & Marcos Sanso, 2005. "Migration dynamics, growth and convergence," Documentos de Trabajo dt2005-09, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
  • Handle: RePEc:zar:wpaper:dt2005-09
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.dteconz.unizar.es/DT2005-09.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier X, 1996. "The Classical Approach to Convergence Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(437), pages 1019-1036, July.
    2. James E. Rauch, 1993. "Economic Development, Urban Underemployment, and Income Inequality," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 26(4), pages 901-918, November.
    3. Reichlin, Pietro & Rustichini, Aldo, 1998. "Diverging patterns with endogenous labor migration," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 703-728, May.
    4. Dustmann, Christian & Kirchkamp, Oliver, 2002. "The optimal migration duration and activity choice after re-migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 351-372, April.
    5. Faini, Riccardo, 1996. "Increasing returns, migrations and convergence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 121-136, April.
    6. Bertola, Giuseppe, 1992. "Models of Economic Integration and Localized Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 651, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Kemnitz, Alexander, 2001. "Endogenous growth and the gains from immigration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 215-218, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Patricia Bachiller & María José Arcas, 2006. "Performance and capital structure of privatized firms in the european union," Documentos de Trabajo dt2006-02, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    2. Raúl Serrano & Vicente Pinilla, 2014. "New directions of trade for the agri-food industry: a disaggregated approach for different income countries, 1963–2000," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 23(1), pages 1-22, December.
    3. Jesús Clemente & Rafael González-Val & Irene Olloqui, 2011. "Zipf’s and Gibrat’s laws for migrations," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 47(1), pages 235-248, August.
    4. Jorge González, 2015. "Estimating income elasticities of leisure activities using cross-sectional categorized data," Documentos de Trabajo dt2015-02, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    5. Jacques Poot, 2007. "Demographic Change and Regional Competitiveness: The Effects of Immigration and Ageing," Population Studies Centre Discussion Papers dp-64, University of Waikato, Population Studies Centre.
    6. Elena Vakulenko, 2016. "Does migration lead to regional convergence in Russia?," International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 9(1), pages 1-25.
    7. Joan Muysken & Thomas Ziesemer, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Economic Growth in an Ageing Economy," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 35-63.
    8. Joaquín Andaluz, 2008. "Vertical product differentiation with subcontracting," Documentos de Trabajo dt2008-01, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    9. Nurgul Ukueva, 2011. "Migration, Remittances and Growth," DEGIT Conference Papers c016_032, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    10. M. T. Aparicio & I. Villanúa, 2012. "Selection criteria for overlapping binary Models," Documentos de Trabajo dt2012-01, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    11. Oscar Afonso & Susana Gabriel & Pedro Mazeda Gil, 2016. "Could immigration explain wage inequality in a skill-biased technological model?," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 43(3), pages 559-577, August.
    12. Brambila Macias, Jose, 2008. "Remittances, Migration and Informality in Mexico. A Simple Model," MPRA Paper 8373, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Raúl Serrano & Isabel Acero-Fraile & Natalia Dejo-Oricain, 2017. "Collaborative networks and export intensity in family firms: a quantile regression approach," Documentos de Trabajo dt2017-04, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zar:wpaper:dt2005-09. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Vicente Pinilla). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/fezares.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.