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Work History Patterns and the Occupational Attainment of Women

Author

Listed:
  • Greenhalgh, Christine
  • Stewart, Mark

    (Department of Economics, University of Warwick)

Abstract

One of the main differences between the labour market behaviour of men and women lies in the discontinuity of labour force attachment exhibited by most women over their lifetime - largely, but not exclusively, for the purpose of raising a family. These interruptions to their labour market experience constitute an important influence on the labour market position of women and provide a potentially important factor in the explanation of their labour market disadvantate. Skills are obtained to a considerable extent through labour market experience and may be blunted in periods of absence from the labour force. In addition, absence from the labour force removes an individual labour market and may thereby reduce the probability of gaining extry to the better jobs on re-entry. The objectives of this paper are firstly to describe the various work-history patterns exhibited by U.K. women and, secondly, to quantify the effect of these life-cycle factors on the occupational attainment, occupational progress and earnings of women. The data source is the National Training Survey (NTS) which provides a unique retrospective longitudinal data set on the work histories of over 50,000 individuals (For details see Manpower Services Commission (1976).

Suggested Citation

  • Greenhalgh, Christine & Stewart, Mark, 1982. "Work History Patterns and the Occupational Attainment of Women," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 212, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:212
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    1. repec:ilo:ilowps:486459 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Neuman, Shoshana., 2014. "Job quality in segmented labour markets : the Israeli case: country case study on labour market segmentation," ILO Working Papers 994864593402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Elena Fabrizi & Alessio Farcomeni & Valerio Gatta, 2012. "Modelling work history patterns in the Italian labour market," Statistical Methods & Applications, Springer;Società Italiana di Statistica, vol. 21(2), pages 227-247, June.
    4. Neuman, Shoshana, 2015. "Job Quality in Segmented Labor Markets: The Israeli Case," CEPR Discussion Papers 10734, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Miguel Malo & Fernando Muñoz-Bullón, 2008. "Women’s family-related career breaks: a long-term British perspective," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 127-167, June.
    6. Mc Quaid, Ronald & Bergmann, Ariel, 2008. "Employer recruitment preferences and discrimination: a stated preference experiment," MPRA Paper 30801, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Shoshana Neuman, 2014. "Job Quality in Segmented Labor Markets: The Israeli Case," Working Papers 2014-12, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    8. Neuman, Shoshana, 2014. "Job Quality in Segmented Labor Markets: The Israeli Case," IZA Discussion Papers 8750, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. repec:eee:labchp:v:1:y:1986:i:c:p:103-204 is not listed on IDEAS

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