IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wpa/wuwpri/9507001.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Event Study Methodology: A New And Stochastically Flexible Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Patrick L. Brockett
  • Hwei-Mei CHEN
  • James R. GARVEN

Abstract

A number of articles have documented that the classical event study methodology exhibits a bias toward detecting "effects", irrespective of whether such effects actually exist. This paper addresses this bias by presenting a new methodology that explicitly incorporates stochastic behaviors of the market that are documented to exist and which are assumed away by the classical event study methodology. We apply our new methodology to an examination of the effect of the passage of California’s Proposition 103 on the prices of insurance stocks. Proposition 103 was important regulatory event that previously has been investigated using classical event study techniques. We find that the passage of Proposition 103 did not significantly impact the returns on most insurance company stocks, a result that stands in stark contrast to other studies. Consequently, our study suggests that the application of the classical event study methodology, without checking the behavior of security returns for stochastic beta and GARCH effects, may very well cause researchers to draw inappropriate conclusions.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick L. Brockett & Hwei-Mei CHEN & James R. GARVEN, 1995. "Event Study Methodology: A New And Stochastically Flexible Approach," Risk and Insurance 9507001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpri:9507001
    Note: Type of Document - PostScript; pages: 46; figures: included
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/ri/papers/9507/9507001.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/ri/papers/9507/9507001.ps.gz
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. J. David Cummins & Sharon Tennyson, 1992. "Controlling Automobile Insurance Costs," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 95-115, Spring.
    2. Fields, Joseph A. & Ghosh, Chinmoy & Kidwell, David S. & Klein, Linda S., 1990. "Wealth effects of regulatory reform *1: The reaction to California's proposition 103," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 233-250.
    3. Schwert, G William & Seguin, Paul J, 1990. " Heteroskedasticity in Stock Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(4), pages 1129-1155, September.
    4. Frankfurter, George M. & McGoun, Elton G., 1993. "The event study: An industrial strength method," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 121-141.
    5. Boehmer, Ekkehart & Masumeci, Jim & Poulsen, Annette B., 1991. "Event-study methodology under conditions of event-induced variance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 253-272, December.
    6. Connolly, Robert A., 1989. "An Examination of the Robustness of the Weekend Effect," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(02), pages 133-169, June.
    7. Breusch, T S & Pagan, A R, 1979. "A Simple Test for Heteroscedasticity and Random Coefficient Variation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(5), pages 1287-1294, September.
    8. Brown, Stephen J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1980. "Measuring security price performance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 205-258, September.
    9. Asquith, Paul & Bruner, Robert F. & Mullins, David Jr., 1983. "The gains to bidding firms from merger," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1-4), pages 121-139, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpri:9507001. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA). General contact details of provider: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.