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Solow and the Native Americans: Technological Residuals and the Economic Performance of U.S. Native American Economies

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  • Voxi Heinrich Amavilah

    (REEPS & Glendale College)

Abstract

This paper decomposes the large regression residuals of income across 84 U.S. Native American economies (USNAEs) into Solow and Solow-like parts. Decomposition is accomplished algebraically. The calculations find a weak to negative correlation between income and Solow residuals, and a strong correlation between income and Solow-like residuals, especially those associated with human capital and external technology. It also finds that technological residuals are skewed towards high income USNAEs. The reason seems to be that high income USNAEs are better able to build human capital which supports the Nelson-Phelps channel for transmitting technology from external sources.

Suggested Citation

  • Voxi Heinrich Amavilah, 2005. "Solow and the Native Americans: Technological Residuals and the Economic Performance of U.S. Native American Economies," Development and Comp Systems 0505008, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0505008
    Note: Type of Document - wpd; pages: 29. updated edition of an early version - Figures available on requeat if not clear.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    performance; Solow-Solow-like technological residuals; U.S. Native American economies (USNAEs); infrastructure; superstructure; growth;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • R30 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - General
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • P47 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Performance and Prospects
    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada

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