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Structural change in Ethiopia : an employment perspective


  • Martins, Pedro


This paper investigates whether the Ethiopian economy is undergoing a virtuous process of structural change. In particular, it assesses the relative contributions of within-sector and between-sector productivity to output per capita growth. Based on data disaggregated into eight sectors for the period 1996-2011, the analysis suggests that the structure of output has changed considerably -- predominantly from agriculture to services -- but changes in the composition of employment have lagged behind. Labor productivity growth has been strong across most sectors, albeit mainly driven by within-sector productivity improvements. Nonetheless, the pace of structural change is accelerating and its relative contribution to output growth is increasing.

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  • Martins, Pedro, 2014. "Structural change in Ethiopia : an employment perspective," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6749, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6749

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alan B. Krueger, 1999. "Experimental Estimates of Education Production Functions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 497-532.
    2. repec:fth:prinin:357 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Anne Case & Angus Deaton, 1999. "School Inputs and Educational Outcomes in South Africa," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 1047-1084.
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    8. Menno Pradhan & Daniel Suryadarma & Amanda Beatty & Maisy Wong & Arya Gaduh & Armida Alisjahbana & Rima Prama Artha, 2014. "Improving Educational Quality through Enhancing Community Participation: Results from a Randomized Field Experiment in Indonesia," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 105-126, April.
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    10. Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2011. "School quality, clustering and government subsidy in post-apartheid South Africa," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 146-156, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank Group, 2016. "Unlocking Firm Level Productivity and Promoting More Inclusive Growth," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23792, The World Bank.
    2. Brixiova, Zuzana & Ncube, Mthuli, 2013. "Entrepreneurship and the Business Environment in Africa: An Application to Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 7553, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. World Bank Group, 2014. "Third Ethiopia Economic Update : Strengthening Export Performance through Improved Competitiveness," World Bank Other Operational Studies 20026, The World Bank.

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    Labor Markets; Labor Policies; Economic Theory&Research; E-Business; Labor Management and Relations;

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