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Trade finance in a liquidity crisis


  • Ellingsen, Tore
  • Vlachos, Jonas


The paper discusses the reasons for supporting international trade finance during a liquidity crisis. Targeted interventions are justified when prices are rigid and sellers insist on immediate payment due to fears of strategic default. In this case, buyers who reject the seller's offer fail to internalize the seller's benefit from additional liquidity. A general infusion of credit will not facilitate the beneficial transaction, but an infusion targeted at the buyer's bank's trade finance supply will do so. Since there is a need for interventions in one country to benefit actors in another, international coordination is called for.

Suggested Citation

  • Ellingsen, Tore & Vlachos, Jonas, 2009. "Trade finance in a liquidity crisis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5136, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5136

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Schmidt-Eisenlohr, Tim, 2013. "Towards a theory of trade finance," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 96-112.
    2. Andreas Hoefele & Tim Schmidt-Eisenlohr & Zhihong Yu, 2016. "Payment choice in international trade: Theory and evidence from cross-country firm-level data," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 49(1), pages 296-319, February.
    3. Kemal Turkcan, 2016. "Evolving Patterns of Payment Methods in Turkish Foreign Trade," World Journal of Applied Economics, WERI-World Economic Research Institute, vol. 2(1), pages 3-29, June.
    4. Chor, Davin & Manova, Kalina, 2012. "Off the cliff and back? Credit conditions and international trade during the global financial crisis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 117-133.
    5. Ivo Karilaid & Tõnn Talpsepp & Tarvo Vaarmets, 2014. "Implications of the liquidity crisis in the Baltic-Nordic region," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 14(1-2), pages 35-54, December.
    6. Independent Evaluation Group, 2013. "Evaluation of the International Finance Corporation's Global Trade Finance Program, 2006-12," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15769.

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    Debt Markets; Emerging Markets; Economic Theory&Research; Access to Finance; Trade Law;

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