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Who bears the cost of Russia's military draft?

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  • Lokshin, Michael
  • Yemtsov, Ruslan

Abstract

The authors use data from a large nationally representative survey in Russia to analyze the distributional and welfare implications of draft avoidance as a common response to Russia's highly unpopular conscription system. They develop a simple theoretical model that describes household compliance decisions with respect to enlistment. The authors use several econometric techniques to estimate the effect of various household characteristics on the probability of serving in the army and the implications for household income. Their results indicate that the burden of conscription falls disproportionately on the poor. Poor, rural households, with a low level of education, are more likely to have sons who are enlisted than urban, wealthy, and better-educated families. The losses incurred by the poor are disproportionately large and exceed the statutory rates of personal income taxes.

Suggested Citation

  • Lokshin, Michael & Yemtsov, Ruslan, 2005. "Who bears the cost of Russia's military draft?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3547, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3547
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Panu Poutvaara & Andreas Wagener, 2011. "The Political Economy of Conscription," Chapters,in: The Handbook on the Political Economy of War, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Panu Poutvaara & Andreas Wagener, 2011. "The Political Economy of Conscription," Chapters,in: The Handbook on the Political Economy of War, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Danko Tarabar & Joshua C. Hall, 2016. "Explaining the worldwide decline in the length of mandatory military service, 1970–2010," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 168(1), pages 55-74, July.
    4. Thomas Koch & Javier Birchenall, 2016. "Taking versus taxing: an analysis of conscription in a private information economy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 167(3), pages 177-199, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Poverty Lines; Peace&Peacekeeping; Housing&Human Habitats; Economic Theory&Research; Environmental Economics&Policies;

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