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The New Zealand Population: A Synopsis of Trends and Projections 1991-2016


  • Sandra Baxendine

    (Waikato District Health Board)

  • Bill Cochrane

    (University of Waikato)

  • A. Dharmalingam

    (University of Waikato)

  • Sarah Hillcoat-Nalletamby

    (University of Waikato)

  • Jacques Poot

    () (University of Waikato)


Although there are many excellent documents and online resources available on New Zealand population trends, it is useful to highlight some key trends in one short document. This paper provides a synopsis of trends with respect to population size and age structure, sub-national population size and change, international migration, ethnicity, families and generations, fertility and mortality and education and work.

Suggested Citation

  • Sandra Baxendine & Bill Cochrane & A. Dharmalingam & Sarah Hillcoat-Nalletamby & Jacques Poot, 2005. "The New Zealand Population: A Synopsis of Trends and Projections 1991-2016," Population Studies Centre Discussion Papers dp-50, University of Waikato, Population Studies Centre.
  • Handle: RePEc:wai:pscdps:dp-50

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2005. "A Meta-Analytic Assessment of the Effect of Immigration on Wages," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 451-477, July.
    2. Jacques Poot, 2005. "Measuring the Economic Impact of Immigration: A Scoping Paper," Population Studies Centre Discussion Papers dp-48, University of Waikato, Population Studies Centre.
    3. Sarah Hillcoat-Nall├ętamby & A. Dharmalingam, 2004. "Solidarity across generations in New Zealand: factors influencing parental support for children within a three-generational context," Population Studies Centre Discussion Papers dp-46, University of Waikato, Population Studies Centre.
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    More about this item


    Population Struture; Migration; Family; Education; Work;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population


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