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The Value of Native Biodiversity Enhancement in New Zealand: A Case Study of the Greater Wellington Area

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Abstract

New Zealand’s biodiversity consists of over 80,000 native plants, animals and fungi, many of which are indigenous and located on private property. To enhance native biodiversity and discourage activities that may deplete it, policies can be introduced that can encourage individual self-interest to coincide with social interest. Economic values for biodiversity can help to determine the best policy tools to use. In this project, we surveyed Greater Wellington Region households to determine their biodiversity enhancement values using the contingent valuation approach. Greater Wellington respondents placed a significant value on both private land biodiversity as well as public land biodiversity.

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  • Pamela Kaval & Richard Yao & Terry Parminter, 2007. "The Value of Native Biodiversity Enhancement in New Zealand: A Case Study of the Greater Wellington Area," Working Papers in Economics 07/22, University of Waikato.
  • Handle: RePEc:wai:econwp:07/22
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    File URL: ftp://wms-webprod1.mngt.waikato.ac.nz/RePEc/wai/econwp/0722.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Villegas, Clara & Coria, Jessica, 2009. "Taxes, Permits and the Adoption of Abatement Technology under Imperfect Compliance," Working Papers in Economics 368, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    2. Dikgang, Johane & Muchapondwa, Edwin, 2012. "The valuation of biodiversity conservation by the South African Khomani San “bushmen” community," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 7-14.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    biodiversity; non-market valuation; native species; private landholders; New Zealand;

    JEL classification:

    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

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