IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/vua/wpaper/1996-7.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Speed behaviour of car drivers: a statistical analysis of acceptance of changes in speed policies in the Netherlands

Author

Listed:
  • Rienstra, S.A.

    (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Faculteit der Economische Wetenschappen en Econometrie (Free University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics Sciences, Business Administration and Economitrics)

  • Rietveld, P.

Abstract

Lowering speed of car drivers will have positive impacts on environmental pollution and the number of road accidents. It is therefore a potentially interesting policy option for governments which want to reduce negative externalities of transport. In this paper the acceptance of such polities is analyzed by means of a survey questionnaire among car drivers and public transport users. First, an analysis is presented on the general speed behaviour, the behaviour on distinct road types, the acceptance of lower limits, and the acceptance and perception of electronic speed limiters. Next, a statistical analysis of subgroups is carried out. It is concluded that the speed of car drivers is in general not considered as a main problematic issue by drivers and non-drivers; therefore there is little scope for the acceptance of changes in speed polities. When speed polities are changed (lower limits) it seems most effective to emphasize safety aspects in order to increase support of the public. However, psychological factors of speed behaviour may play an important role in this respect.

Suggested Citation

  • Rienstra, S.A. & Rietveld, P., 1996. "Speed behaviour of car drivers: a statistical analysis of acceptance of changes in speed policies in the Netherlands," Serie Research Memoranda 0007, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vua:wpaper:1996-7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://degree.ubvu.vu.nl/repec/vua/wpaper/pdf/19960007.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Verhoef, Erik T. & Rouwendal, Jan & Rietveld, Piet, 1999. "Congestion Caused by Speed Differences," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 533-556, May.
    2. Mogens Fosgerau, 2005. "Speed and Income," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 39(2), pages 225-240, May.
    3. Olof Johansson-Stenman & Peter Martinsson, 2005. "Anyone for higher speed limits? – Self-interested and adaptive political preferences," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 122(3), pages 319-331, March.
    4. Van Ommeren, Jos & Fosgerau, Mogens, 2009. "Workers' marginal costs of commuting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 38-47, January.
    5. Giles, Margaret J., 2004. "Driver speed compliance in Western Australia: a multivariate analysis," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 227-235, July.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:vua:wpaper:1996-7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (R. Dam). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/fewvunl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.