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Reducing the Welfare Dependence of Single-Mother Families: Health-Related Employment Barriers and Policy Responses

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  • Jean Kimmel

    () (Western Michigan University)

Abstract

The problem of rising health care costs and the related increased dependency on health insurance coverage has moved to the forefront of the U.S. policy agenda in recent years and was a fundamental component of President Clinton's 1992 campaign platform. However, the President's 1994 health care reform proposal was unsuccessful, and current GOP proposals to cut the rate of growth of Medicare and Medicaid spending while the eligible population and costs both continue to grow fail to address the problem of coverage. In fact, one likely side effect of the cost-shifting to private insurance carriers will be to increase the ranks of the uninsured. This paper addresses one aspect of the coverage problem: specifically, how do the competing interests of public and private coverage for single mothers affect these mothers' willingness to participate in the labor market? And, how might restrictions concerning welfare eligibility currently undergoing legislative debate enter into the equation?

Suggested Citation

  • Jean Kimmel, 1996. "Reducing the Welfare Dependence of Single-Mother Families: Health-Related Employment Barriers and Policy Responses," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 96-43, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:96-43
    Note: A revised draft with the title "Reducing the Welfare Dependence of Unmarried Mothers: Health-Related Employment Barriers and Policy Responses" appears in Eastern Economic Journal Vol. 23, No.2 (Spring 1997).
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barbara L. Wolfe & Steven C. Hill, 1995. "The Effect of Health on the Work Effort of Single Mothers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(1), pages 42-62.
    2. Rebecca M. Blank, 1989. "The Effect of Medical Need and Medicaid on AFDC Participation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(1), pages 54-87.
    3. B. Wolfe & S. C. Hill, "undated". "The effect of health on the work effort of low-income single mothers," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 979-92, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    4. Aaron S. Yelowitz, 1995. "The Medicaid Notch, Labor Supply, and Welfare Participation: Evidence from Eligibility Expansions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 909-939.
    5. Michael Grossman, 1972. "The Demand for Health: A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number gros72-1, June.
    6. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    7. Anne E. Winkler, 1991. "The Incentive Effects of Medicaid on Women's Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 308-337.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    single; mothers; Kimmel; Medicare; Medicaid; work;

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets

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