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Gender preference at birth: A new measure for son preference based on stated preferences and observed measures of parents' fertility decisions

Author

Listed:
  • Mehwish Ghulam Ali
  • Ashton De Silva
  • Sarah Sinclair
  • Ankita Mishra

Abstract

Investigating preference for sons is a continuing focal area of development economics and demographic research. Son preference presents a challenge in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals of 'no poverty', 'good health and wellbeing', and 'gender equality' by 2030. It is thus important to investigate son preference to inform policy-makers of the potential challenges in achieving these goals. Inaccurate interpretation of the mechanisms of son preference could misinform policy analysis and result in unintended consequences.

Suggested Citation

  • Mehwish Ghulam Ali & Ashton De Silva & Sarah Sinclair & Ankita Mishra, 2022. "Gender preference at birth: A new measure for son preference based on stated preferences and observed measures of parents' fertility decisions," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2022-88, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2022-88
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    4. Monica Das Gupta & Jiang Zhenghua & Li Bohua & Xie Zhenming & Woojin Chung & Bae Hwa-Ok, 2003. "Why is Son preference so persistent in East and South Asia? a cross-country study of China, India and the Republic of Korea," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(2), pages 153-187.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human fertility; Family planning; Welfare; Wellbeing;
    All these keywords.

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