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The Irish credit bubble


  • Morgan Kelly


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  • Morgan Kelly, 2009. "The Irish credit bubble," Working Papers 200932, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:200932

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ruth Hancock & Stephen Pudney & Geraldine Barker & Monica Hernandez & Holly Sutherland, 2004. "The Take-Up of Multiple Means-Tested Benefits by British Pensioners: Evidence from the Family Resources Survey," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 25(3), pages 279-303, September.
    2. Marlene Kim & Thanos Mergoupis, 1995. "The Working Poor and Welfare Recipiency," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_151, Levy Economics Institute.
    3. Monica Hernandez & Stephen Pudney & Ruth Hancock, 2006. "The Welfare Cost of Means Testing: Pensioner Participation in Income," Working Papers 2006004, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2006.
    4. Janet Currie, 2004. "The Take Up of Social Benefits," NBER Working Papers 10488, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Kathleen McGarry, 1996. "Factors Determining Participation of the Elderly in Supplemental Security Income," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(2), pages 331-358.
    6. Henrik Jacobsen Kleven & Wojciech Kopczuk, 2011. "Transfer Program Complexity and the Take-Up of Social Benefits," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 54-90, February.
    7. Moffitt, Robert, 1983. "An Economic Model of Welfare Stigma," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(5), pages 1023-1035, December.
    8. Stephen Pudney & Monica Hernandez & Ruth Hancock, 2007. "The welfare cost of means-testing: pensioner participation in income support," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 581-598.
    9. Gustafsson, Bjorn, 1984. "Macroeconomic performance, old age security and the rate of social assistance recipients in Sweden," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 319-338, December.
    10. Virginia Hernanz & Franck Malherbet & Michele Pellizzari, 2004. "Take-Up of Welfare Benefits in OECD Countries: A Review of the Evidence," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 17, OECD Publishing.
    11. Rebecca M. Blank & Patricia Ruggles, 1996. "When Do Women Use Aid to Families with Dependent Children and Food Stamps? The Dynamics of Eligibility Versus Participation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(1), pages 57-89.
    12. Hilke Almut Kayser & Joachim R. Frick, 2000. "Take It or Leave It: (Non-) Take-up Behavior of Social Assistance in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 210, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    13. Rebecca M. Blank, 2001. "What Causes Public Assistance Caseloads to Grow?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(1), pages 85-118.
    14. Glen Bramley & Sharon Lancaster & David Gordon, 2000. "Benefit Take-up and the Geography of Poverty in Scotland," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(6), pages 507-519.
    15. Patricia M. Anderson & Bruce D. Meyer, 1997. "Unemployment Insurance Takeup Rates and the After-Tax Value of Benefits," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 913-937.
    16. Riphahn, Regina T, 2001. "Rational Poverty or Poor Rationality? The Take-Up Study of Social Assistance Benefits," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 47(3), pages 379-398, September.
    17. Duclos, Jean-Yves, 1995. "Modelling the take-up of state support," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 391-415, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Connor, Gregory & Flavin, Thomas & O’Kelly, Brian, 2012. "The U.S. and Irish credit crises: Their distinctive differences and common features," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 60-79.
    2. van Bekkum, Sjoerd, 2016. "Ireland’s 2010 EU/IMF intervention: Costs and benefits," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 175-183.
    3. Alison Johnston & Aidan Regan, 2015. "Taming Global Finance in an Age of Capital? Wage-Setting Institutions' Mitigating Effects on Housing Bubbles," LEQS – LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series 87, European Institute, LSE.
    4. Aramburu Leunda, Aitor & Aramburu Leunda, Garbiñe, 2011. "Irlanda: euroa, higiezinen burbuila eta gaur egungo egoera," Revista de Dirección y Administración de Empresas, Universidad del País Vasco - Escuela Universitaria de Estudios Empresariales de San Sebastián.
    5. Sebastian Dellepiane & Niamh Hardiman & Jon Las Heras, 2013. "Building on easy money:The political economy of housing bubbles in Ireland and Spain," Working Papers 201318, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    6. Michelle Norris & Menelaos Gkartzios & Dermot Coates, 2014. "Property-led Urban, Town and Rural Regeneration in Ireland: Positive and Perverse Outcomes in Different Spatial and Socio-economic Contexts," Open Access publications 10197/4952, Research Repository, University College Dublin.
    7. Michelle Norris & Nessa Winston, 2012. "Young People's Trajectories through Irish Housing Booms and Busts: headship, housing and labour market access among the under 30s since the late 1960s," Open Access publications 10197/4922, Research Repository, University College Dublin.
    8. Rock, Sarah & Ahern, Aoife & Caulfield, Brian, 2016. "The economic boom, bust and transport inequity in suburban Dublin, Ireland," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 32-43.
    9. Howden, David, 2013. "The Icelandic and Irish Banking Crises: Alternative Paths to a Credit-Induced Collapse," MPRA Paper 79602, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Michelle Norris & Menelaos Gkartzios & Dermot Coates, 2013. "Property-led Urban, Town and Rural Regeneration in Ireland: positive and perverse outcomes in different implementation contexts," Working Papers 201311, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.

    More about this item


    Ireland--Economic conditions--21st century; Global Financial Crisis; 2008-2009; Credit--Ireland; Banks and banking--Ireland;

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