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Alternative Approaches to Measuring House Price Inflation

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  • Diewert, Erwin

Abstract

The paper uses data on sales of detached houses in a small Dutch town over 14 quarters starting at the first quarter of 2005 in order to compare various methods for constructing a house price index over this period. Four classes of methods are considered: (i) stratification techniques plus normal index number theory; (ii) time dummy hedonic regression models; (iii) hedonic imputation techniques and (iv) additive in land and structures hedonic regression models. The last approach is used in order to decompose the price of a house into land and structure components and it relies on the imposition of some monotonicity constraints or exogenous information on price movements for structures. The problems associated with constructing an index for the stock of houses using information on the sales of houses are also considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Diewert, Erwin, 2011. "Alternative Approaches to Measuring House Price Inflation," Economics working papers erwin_diewert-2011-1, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 07 Jan 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:ubc:bricol:erwin_diewert-2011-1
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    File URL: http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/diewert/dp1010.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Fare, Rolf & Grosskopf, Shawna & Shang, Chenjun & Sickles, Robin, 2015. "Pricing Characteristics: An Application of Shepard's Dual Lemma," Working Papers 15-013, Rice University, Department of Economics.
    2. Esmeralda A. Ramalho & Joaquim J.S. Ramalho, 2014. "Convenient links for the estimation of hedonic price indexes: the case of unique, infrequently traded assets," Statistica Neerlandica, Netherlands Society for Statistics and Operations Research, vol. 68(2), pages 91-117, May.
    3. Porfirio Guevara & Robert J. Hill & Michael Scholz, 2015. "Hedonic Indexes for Public and Private Housing in Costa Rica," Graz Economics Papers 2015-05, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
    4. Olivier Schöni, 2014. "Asymptotic Properties of Imputed Hedonic Price Indices," SERC Discussion Papers 0166, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    5. Schöni, Olivier, 2014. "Asymptotic properties of imputed hedonic price indices," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64500, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Property price indexes; hedonic regressions; stratification techniques; rolling year indexes; Fisher ideal indexes;

    JEL classification:

    • C2 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand

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