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Economic Growth and Development

Listed author(s):
  • Mark Setterfield

    ()

The historical growth record is reviewed and growth is shown to have resulted in divergence between the incomes of fast growing rich economies and slower growing poorer economies. Supply-led, neoclassical growth is then contrasted with demand-led, Keynesian growth. Three Keynesian growth theories (Harrodian, Kaleckian, and Kaldorian) are outlined and shown to differ according to whether investment spending or export demand is the key “driver” of demand formation and growth. The properties of Keynesian growth are then identified and discussed. These include the relationship between saving behaviour and growth, the effects of income redistribution on growth, the relationship between technical progress and growth, and the interaction of supply and demand in the growth process.

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File URL: http://internet2.trincoll.edu/repec/WorkingPapers2014/WP14-04.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Trinity College, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1404.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2014
Handle: RePEc:tri:wpaper:1404
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Web page: http://www.trincoll.edu/Academics/MajorsAndMinors/Economics/Pages/default.aspx

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  1. A. B. Atkinson, 2009. "Factor shares: the principal problem of political economy?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 3-16, Spring.
  2. Paul Davidson, 1991. "Is Probability Theory Relevant for Uncertainty? A Post Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 129-143, Winter.
  3. Stern, Nicholas, 1991. "The Determinants of Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(404), pages 122-133, January.
  4. Antonella Palumbo, 2009. "Adjusting Theory to Reality: The Role of Aggregate Demand in Kaldor's Late Contributions on Economic Growth," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 341-368.
  5. Thomas I. Palley, 2002. "Economic contradictions coming home to roost? Does the U.S. economy face a long-term aggregate demand generation problem?," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 9-32.
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